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Re: Log Cabins

Posted: September 19th, 2022, 9:58 pm
by mudflap

Re: Log Cabins

Posted: September 19th, 2022, 11:38 pm
by farmerchick
I've got a question for you mudflap.....what prep do you have to do with your logs before you use them....like do you dry them or what exactly...probably a dumb question but I want my husband to take some cedar trees I have and make them into porch posts and interior posts in my new living area we just got thru adding on. He says its too much work to use them....idk what the process even is after cutting and skinning off the bark......his idea is to use 6x6 posts and wrap them in stone....idk I'd like the rustic Log look...what is the process to prepare your own trees for log posts or slab them for tables?

Re: Log Cabins

Posted: September 19th, 2022, 11:59 pm
by bbrown
Cedar is very cool, peel the bark and let it dry. But have you ever spent time in a cedar building? A lot of people get quite sick from it. It takes a lot to seal it if it does.

Re: Log Cabins

Posted: September 20th, 2022, 11:48 am
by mudflap
farmerchick wrote: September 19th, 2022, 11:38 pm I've got a question for you mudflap.....what prep do you have to do with your logs before you use them....like do you dry them or what exactly...probably a dumb question but I want my husband to take some cedar trees I have and make them into porch posts and interior posts in my new living area we just got thru adding on. He says its too much work to use them....idk what the process even is after cutting and skinning off the bark......his idea is to use 6x6 posts and wrap them in stone....idk I'd like the rustic Log look...what is the process to prepare your own trees for log posts or slab them for tables?
sure - so this post has been drying for about 6 months. it's not quite dry, but it's good enough - meaning, it's not going to warp or twist at this point. Here's a way to dry wood naturally: https://www.woodmagazine.com/materials- ... ing-lumber

basically, let it dry in the sun for a few days, then put down a tarp, and stack it up neatly on a pallet or bricks or something, but out of the weather with 1/2" sticks in between. paint the ends with latex paint to slow the drying process so they won't crack.

As for peeling, it's not that hard- just need a MUT (multi-use-tool) from Harbor Freight:

Re: Log Cabins

Posted: September 20th, 2022, 8:06 pm
by mudflap
oh - I forgot the "slabbing part":

https://www.bitchute.com/video/KEWQiECrzf0M/

A mill like this will now run you about $5k or more. But you can get this one on Amazon for $30 - clamps to a chainsaw: https://www.amazon.com/Chainsaw-Lumber- ... 0886HVRLH/, then you screw a 2x6 to the log and use it as a guide to make slabs. I've used one - works ok, but you need an extremely sharp chain.

Re: Log Cabins

Posted: October 1st, 2022, 7:47 am
by mudflap

Re: Log Cabins

Posted: October 2nd, 2022, 10:41 am
by AkalAish
We live in a log home in Wasilla. The greatest challenge for us is, by far, maintenance of the outside. It is two stories, and the ground is quite uneven surrounding our home. (We live in a heavily wooded area.) Washing, sanding, staining, chinking...it is a monumental task. Luckily, we only have to repeat the process every five years or so. Still...we are not spring chickens anymore...

The weather here is another issue that can be prohibitive. As the stain cannot get wet once applied (as well as just before we apply it), there is a VERY NARROW window of time we can stain where you hope and pray that it will not rain. Last summer we got lucky and were able to complete the task.

Re: Log Cabins

Posted: October 2nd, 2022, 12:28 pm
by mudflap
AkalAish wrote: October 2nd, 2022, 10:41 am We live in a log home in Wasilla. The greatest challenge for us is, by far, maintenance of the outside. It is two stories, and the ground is quite uneven surrounding our home. (We live in a heavily wooded area.) Washing, sanding, staining, chinking...it is a monumental task. Luckily, we only have to repeat the process every five years or so. Still...we are not spring chickens anymore...

The weather here is another issue that can be prohibitive. As the stain cannot get wet once applied (as well as just before we apply it), there is a VERY NARROW window of time we can stain where you hope and pray that it will not rain. Last summer we got lucky and were able to complete the task.
Wow - that sounds like a lot of work! I'll have to stain mine every few years, but the style we went with - with its large roof overhangs (4' on the eaves and 8' on the gables), and natural chink, I expect the chinking will last practically forever. The large roof means the logs stay almost completely dry, as most of our rain comes straight down.

I also cleared out all the trees within 40 feet of the place, so we don't even get pine needles on the roof.