Log Cabins

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mudflap
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Re: Log Cabins

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Baurak Ale wrote: April 28th, 2022, 8:12 am
We are also putting in a large garden right now. It feels right but I don't expect success to be 100% the first time around. I've been telling my friends around here that the most valuable thing we will harvest this year is the knowledge from the mistakes we will make. We are going to want to have this down to a science in short order.

As an aside, I happened upon your post about Kalona Supernatural Milk. I used to unload milk tankers for them! I would test the bacteria and fat levels of the milk coming in. Always super clean and super creamy milk coming from those Amish farms. The "low and slow" pasteurization process Kalona Supernatural (we just call it the Kalona creamery) uses really makes a difference. That and the milk they get is sourced from the Amish. Some of the Amish I know are getting irritated by them though because they keep pursuing additional "organic" certifications that have increasingly bizarre rules for the Amish to follow. In a recent example they told me how the Kalona creamery was going to require some sort of milking instructors to come down and teach the Amish how to milk their cows. The Amish man I was speaking to balked at the thought, saying, "Do they think we don't know what we're doing? I'm going to start selling to an A2A2 place down in Missouri before that happens." Mind you this is only one of the latest hurdles the creamery has imposed on their farmers in the pursuit of regulated certifications. The government makes it hard and expensive to get certain labels, further pushing out small-scale family farms. That said, the Kalona creamery could afford to pay around $25 per 100lb of milk—the highest in the industry a couple years ago (most conventional milk farms are paid $5-or-so per 100lb!).

One more anecdote from Amish milking: a family we know used to do the common thing and feed their calves formula so they could maximize the milk production of the mother for increased milk sales. Well they took the advice of Sally Fallon, whose wisdom we stick to in our family's diet, and started feeding their calves their mothers' milk despite the anticipated financial loss from lower milk sales. Turns out they ended up increasing profits because this change eliminated a huge expense that had otherwise been a standard among cow farms: veterinary bills! Turns out that calves raised on their mothers' milk are healthy enough to not need constant doctor upkeep. I've worked with farm veterinary systems and—let me tell you—in the standard livestock industry that is a huge, huge business. Just like people, the medical maintenance of livestock is a money machine when money-driven dietary standards are adhered to.
interesting, thanks for sharing!

And also sad....they keep squeezing that golden goose...

I'll go back to raw before I go back to anything less than Kalona. Yes, I'll have to find a new supplier. There's one guy here in AL that sells to Whole Foods and to the public (I won't shop at Whole Foods - too much Amazon for me...), but I think he does what a lot of them do: stores his milk in the same freezer as his meat. I don't know why they don't get it: plastic will suck up flavors of whatever it's around. makes it taste weird/bad.

we go through about 3 gallons a week for a family of 3. Most people my age can't stomach "milk" anymore (because what they are drinking isn't really milk, duh). huge difference between "walmart" and "super kalona". walmart shouldn't even be able to legally call what they sell, "milk", IMO.

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Baurak Ale
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Re: Log Cabins

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mudflap wrote: April 28th, 2022, 9:49 am
Baurak Ale wrote: April 28th, 2022, 8:12 am
We are also putting in a large garden right now. It feels right but I don't expect success to be 100% the first time around. I've been telling my friends around here that the most valuable thing we will harvest this year is the knowledge from the mistakes we will make. We are going to want to have this down to a science in short order.

As an aside, I happened upon your post about Kalona Supernatural Milk. I used to unload milk tankers for them! I would test the bacteria and fat levels of the milk coming in. Always super clean and super creamy milk coming from those Amish farms. The "low and slow" pasteurization process Kalona Supernatural (we just call it the Kalona creamery) uses really makes a difference. That and the milk they get is sourced from the Amish. Some of the Amish I know are getting irritated by them though because they keep pursuing additional "organic" certifications that have increasingly bizarre rules for the Amish to follow. In a recent example they told me how the Kalona creamery was going to require some sort of milking instructors to come down and teach the Amish how to milk their cows. The Amish man I was speaking to balked at the thought, saying, "Do they think we don't know what we're doing? I'm going to start selling to an A2A2 place down in Missouri before that happens." Mind you this is only one of the latest hurdles the creamery has imposed on their farmers in the pursuit of regulated certifications. The government makes it hard and expensive to get certain labels, further pushing out small-scale family farms. That said, the Kalona creamery could afford to pay around $25 per 100lb of milk—the highest in the industry a couple years ago (most conventional milk farms are paid $5-or-so per 100lb!).

One more anecdote from Amish milking: a family we know used to do the common thing and feed their calves formula so they could maximize the milk production of the mother for increased milk sales. Well they took the advice of Sally Fallon, whose wisdom we stick to in our family's diet, and started feeding their calves their mothers' milk despite the anticipated financial loss from lower milk sales. Turns out they ended up increasing profits because this change eliminated a huge expense that had otherwise been a standard among cow farms: veterinary bills! Turns out that calves raised on their mothers' milk are healthy enough to not need constant doctor upkeep. I've worked with farm veterinary systems and—let me tell you—in the standard livestock industry that is a huge, huge business. Just like people, the medical maintenance of livestock is a money machine when money-driven dietary standards are adhered to.
interesting, thanks for sharing!

And also sad....they keep squeezing that golden goose...

I'll go back to raw before I go back to anything less than Kalona. Yes, I'll have to find a new supplier. There's one guy here in AL that sells to Whole Foods and to the public (I won't shop at Whole Foods - too much Amazon for me...), but I think he does what a lot of them do: stores his milk in the same freezer as his meat. I don't know why they don't get it: plastic will suck up flavors of whatever it's around. makes it taste weird/bad.

we go through about 3 gallons a week for a family of 3. Most people my age can't stomach "milk" anymore (because what they are drinking isn't really milk, duh). huge difference between "walmart" and "super kalona". walmart shouldn't even be able to legally call what they sell, "milk", IMO.
Yeah, we called other brands of milk "white water" back in my Kalona creamery days. lol. In fact, you'd be better off drinking water instead of that gut glue.

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mudflap
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Re: Log Cabins

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Baurak Ale wrote: April 28th, 2022, 12:00 pm
mudflap wrote: April 28th, 2022, 9:49 am
Baurak Ale wrote: April 28th, 2022, 8:12 am
We are also putting in a large garden right now. It feels right but I don't expect success to be 100% the first time around. I've been telling my friends around here that the most valuable thing we will harvest this year is the knowledge from the mistakes we will make. We are going to want to have this down to a science in short order.

As an aside, I happened upon your post about Kalona Supernatural Milk. I used to unload milk tankers for them! I would test the bacteria and fat levels of the milk coming in. Always super clean and super creamy milk coming from those Amish farms. The "low and slow" pasteurization process Kalona Supernatural (we just call it the Kalona creamery) uses really makes a difference. That and the milk they get is sourced from the Amish. Some of the Amish I know are getting irritated by them though because they keep pursuing additional "organic" certifications that have increasingly bizarre rules for the Amish to follow. In a recent example they told me how the Kalona creamery was going to require some sort of milking instructors to come down and teach the Amish how to milk their cows. The Amish man I was speaking to balked at the thought, saying, "Do they think we don't know what we're doing? I'm going to start selling to an A2A2 place down in Missouri before that happens." Mind you this is only one of the latest hurdles the creamery has imposed on their farmers in the pursuit of regulated certifications. The government makes it hard and expensive to get certain labels, further pushing out small-scale family farms. That said, the Kalona creamery could afford to pay around $25 per 100lb of milk—the highest in the industry a couple years ago (most conventional milk farms are paid $5-or-so per 100lb!).

One more anecdote from Amish milking: a family we know used to do the common thing and feed their calves formula so they could maximize the milk production of the mother for increased milk sales. Well they took the advice of Sally Fallon, whose wisdom we stick to in our family's diet, and started feeding their calves their mothers' milk despite the anticipated financial loss from lower milk sales. Turns out they ended up increasing profits because this change eliminated a huge expense that had otherwise been a standard among cow farms: veterinary bills! Turns out that calves raised on their mothers' milk are healthy enough to not need constant doctor upkeep. I've worked with farm veterinary systems and—let me tell you—in the standard livestock industry that is a huge, huge business. Just like people, the medical maintenance of livestock is a money machine when money-driven dietary standards are adhered to.
interesting, thanks for sharing!

And also sad....they keep squeezing that golden goose...

I'll go back to raw before I go back to anything less than Kalona. Yes, I'll have to find a new supplier. There's one guy here in AL that sells to Whole Foods and to the public (I won't shop at Whole Foods - too much Amazon for me...), but I think he does what a lot of them do: stores his milk in the same freezer as his meat. I don't know why they don't get it: plastic will suck up flavors of whatever it's around. makes it taste weird/bad.

we go through about 3 gallons a week for a family of 3. Most people my age can't stomach "milk" anymore (because what they are drinking isn't really milk, duh). huge difference between "walmart" and "super kalona". walmart shouldn't even be able to legally call what they sell, "milk", IMO.
Yeah, we called other brands of milk "white water" back in my Kalona creamery days. lol. In fact, you'd be better off drinking water instead of that gut glue.
"gut glue"

lol!

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mudflap
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Re: Log Cabins

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one of my LHBA friends selling his place in NY (already pending, sorry):

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/9400 ... 3764_zpid/

- 34 acres
- 4bd/4ba/3800 sq ft
- 30x80 barn (?)
- near finger lakes area

can't believe how cheap it's going for....but then again, everyone wants out of NY these days, so maybe the price isn't that surprising.

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Silver Pie
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Re: Log Cabins

Post by Silver Pie »

WOW! :shock:

Edited because the emoji I chose wasn't the one that showed up
Baurak Ale wrote: April 28th, 2022, 8:12 am
As an aside, I happened upon your post about Kalona Supernatural Milk. I used to unload milk tankers for them! I would test the bacteria and fat levels of the milk coming in. Always super clean and super creamy milk coming from those Amish farms. The "low and slow" pasteurization process Kalona Supernatural (we just call it the Kalona creamery) uses really makes a difference. That and the milk they get is sourced from the Amish. Some of the Amish I know are getting irritated by them though because they keep pursuing additional "organic" certifications that have increasingly bizarre rules for the Amish to follow. In a recent example they told me how the Kalona creamery was going to require some sort of milking instructors to come down and teach the Amish how to milk their cows. The Amish man I was speaking to balked at the thought, saying, "Do they think we don't know what we're doing? I'm going to start selling to an A2A2 place down in Missouri before that happens." Mind you this is only one of the latest hurdles the creamery has imposed on their farmers in the pursuit of regulated certifications. The government makes it hard and expensive to get certain labels, further pushing out small-scale family farms. That said, the Kalona creamery could afford to pay around $25 per 100lb of milk—the highest in the industry a couple years ago (most conventional milk farms are paid $5-or-so per 100lb!).

One more anecdote from Amish milking: a family we know used to do the common thing and feed their calves formula so they could maximize the milk production of the mother for increased milk sales. Well they took the advice of Sally Fallon, whose wisdom we stick to in our family's diet, and started feeding their calves their mothers' milk despite the anticipated financial loss from lower milk sales. Turns out they ended up increasing profits because this change eliminated a huge expense that had otherwise been a standard among cow farms: veterinary bills! Turns out that calves raised on their mothers' milk are healthy enough to not need constant doctor upkeep. I've worked with farm veterinary systems and—let me tell you—in the standard livestock industry that is a huge, huge business. Just like people, the medical maintenance of livestock is a money machine when money-driven dietary standards are adhered to.
Last edited by Silver Pie on May 1st, 2022, 10:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Log Cabins

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mudflap wrote: April 28th, 2022, 9:49 am I'll go back to raw before I go back to anything less than Kalona. Yes, I'll have to find a new supplier. There's one guy here in AL that sells to Whole Foods and to the public (I won't shop at Whole Foods - too much Amazon for me...), but I think he does what a lot of them do: stores his milk in the same freezer as his meat. I don't know why they don't get it: plastic will suck up flavors of whatever it's around. makes it taste weird/bad.

we go through about 3 gallons a week for a family of 3. Most people my age can't stomach "milk" anymore (because what they are drinking isn't really milk, duh). huge difference between "walmart" and "super kalona". walmart shouldn't even be able to legally call what they sell, "milk", IMO.
We have been lucky to find a farm (collection of farms, really) in a nearby town that sells raw milk, eggs, and meat. They deliver once a week. I have decided to order milk and eggs on a regular basis, both because I prefer raw milk and "real" eggs, and to support local farmers.

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Re: Log Cabins

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https://www.sltrib.com/news/homeprices/ ... buy-house/
Ogden, Provo and Salt Lake City rank among the top 10 most overvalued markets in the country, according to researchers based at Florida Atlantic University and Florida International University.
This is going to be really, really, really bad for you Utah Mormons. WHEN the market crashes (not if), you'll be stuck paying a mortgage on a house that's not worth the loan you took to buy it. The banks won't negotiate because they will be overextended after loaning out your money to play the stock market casino.

I think you have 3 options:
1. You bought a house 20 years ago and didn't refinance it and almost have it paid off and you're sitting on a gold mine (for now). You either sell now and move to anywhere other than CA and buy the same house for 20% of what yours is "worth", or wait 20-30 years for another upturn in the market (if there is one at that point).
2. You bought a house within the last year, and you'll be stuck with it for the next 20 years, if you still have a job after the rest of the market tanks. if you don't have a job, you'll file for bankruptcy. Bankruptcy will set you back 10-15 years on your financial goals.
3. You haven't bought a house in Utah. Move somewhere else where home values better reflect actual values.

This whole problem was brought on by the consolidation of Government and influence in Salt Lake County. Utah has spurned growth in any county that is not "the Wasatch front". Now there is no more room or resources, and property is scarce. They should have promoted growth at the state level in places like Juab county. Too late now.... Good luck.

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Jason
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Re: Log Cabins

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Silver Pie wrote: May 1st, 2022, 10:35 am
mudflap wrote: April 28th, 2022, 9:49 am I'll go back to raw before I go back to anything less than Kalona. Yes, I'll have to find a new supplier. There's one guy here in AL that sells to Whole Foods and to the public (I won't shop at Whole Foods - too much Amazon for me...), but I think he does what a lot of them do: stores his milk in the same freezer as his meat. I don't know why they don't get it: plastic will suck up flavors of whatever it's around. makes it taste weird/bad.

we go through about 3 gallons a week for a family of 3. Most people my age can't stomach "milk" anymore (because what they are drinking isn't really milk, duh). huge difference between "walmart" and "super kalona". walmart shouldn't even be able to legally call what they sell, "milk", IMO.
We have been lucky to find a farm (collection of farms, really) in a nearby town that sells raw milk, eggs, and meat. They deliver once a week. I have decided to order milk and eggs on a regular basis, both because I prefer raw milk and "real" eggs, and to support local farmers.
We are fortunate to have a really good Jersey raw milk supplier within 15 min drive. 24hr self service. Recently they raised prices in an effort to keep up. My wife suggested we scale back our milk consumption as a result. I countered with I would rather cut back on Amazon, Walmart, China inc, etc rather than cut back on a local provider...and rather than cut back actually scale up our consumption (probably better nutrition to boot if the younger boys are any indication - 12 yr old is 220 and inch taller than me...his 14 yr old brother is 260 and took 3rd in state wrestling champ last fall; his 2nd year wrestling...both of them surpass their 17 yr old brother who didn't go through the growth spurt on raw milk).

We have cut our chickens down from 400 to just over a 100. Quit selling eggs although we are still trading with a neighbor for beef. Peddling eggs was never economical but after 3 yrs decided to give it up. Now we incubate and sell chicks. See how long that lasts in the current environment...

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mudflap
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Re: Log Cabins

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Jason wrote: May 1st, 2022, 8:30 pm
Silver Pie wrote: May 1st, 2022, 10:35 am
mudflap wrote: April 28th, 2022, 9:49 am I'll go back to raw before I go back to anything less than Kalona. Yes, I'll have to find a new supplier. There's one guy here in AL that sells to Whole Foods and to the public (I won't shop at Whole Foods - too much Amazon for me...), but I think he does what a lot of them do: stores his milk in the same freezer as his meat. I don't know why they don't get it: plastic will suck up flavors of whatever it's around. makes it taste weird/bad.

we go through about 3 gallons a week for a family of 3. Most people my age can't stomach "milk" anymore (because what they are drinking isn't really milk, duh). huge difference between "walmart" and "super kalona". walmart shouldn't even be able to legally call what they sell, "milk", IMO.
We have been lucky to find a farm (collection of farms, really) in a nearby town that sells raw milk, eggs, and meat. They deliver once a week. I have decided to order milk and eggs on a regular basis, both because I prefer raw milk and "real" eggs, and to support local farmers.
We are fortunate to have a really good Jersey raw milk supplier within 15 min drive. 24hr self service. Recently they raised prices in an effort to keep up. My wife suggested we scale back our milk consumption as a result. I countered with I would rather cut back on Amazon, Walmart, China inc, etc rather than cut back on a local provider...and rather than cut back actually scale up our consumption (probably better nutrition to boot if the younger boys are any indication - 12 yr old is 220 and inch taller than me...his 14 yr old brother is 260 and took 3rd in state wrestling champ last fall; his 2nd year wrestling...both of them surpass their 17 yr old brother who didn't go through the growth spurt on raw milk).

We have cut our chickens down from 400 to just over a 100. Quit selling eggs although we are still trading with a neighbor for beef. Peddling eggs was never economical but after 3 yrs decided to give it up. Now we incubate and sell chicks. See how long that lasts in the current environment...
Smart. Selling chicks is going to go boom before it goes bust - they can't keep them in stock around here. As long as you're not living in a state that is freaked out about bird flu, I think selling chicks is going to become more and more profitable. Everyone I know is "building their flock". We're probably doing it "prematurely", since we are not living at the cabin yet, but I'm pretty sure waiting till next year is the wrong attitude at this point - might not even be able to get them at all by this time next year.

We weren't going to put in a garden this year either, but the neighbor offered to plow it for free, and well, as my other neighbor said, "if it's free, it's for me". Anyway, it's a tiny tiny garden - 20x20. just something to keep our hands dirty.

And on that - there's only so much daylight each day. I have a full-time job that pays well, so I turn around and buy building supplies with that money, which are getting very spendy very quickly. I ask myself all the time, "is it time to pay attention to the garden, or get this place move-in ready so I'm not driving 30 minutes each way to work on it every day?" I figure the latter is the most important thing to do. I really don't think there's much time left at this point. All signs in my brain are flashing, "Crash this year!".

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Jason
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Re: Log Cabins

Post by Jason »

mudflap wrote: May 1st, 2022, 9:21 pm
Jason wrote: May 1st, 2022, 8:30 pm
Silver Pie wrote: May 1st, 2022, 10:35 am
mudflap wrote: April 28th, 2022, 9:49 am I'll go back to raw before I go back to anything less than Kalona. Yes, I'll have to find a new supplier. There's one guy here in AL that sells to Whole Foods and to the public (I won't shop at Whole Foods - too much Amazon for me...), but I think he does what a lot of them do: stores his milk in the same freezer as his meat. I don't know why they don't get it: plastic will suck up flavors of whatever it's around. makes it taste weird/bad.

we go through about 3 gallons a week for a family of 3. Most people my age can't stomach "milk" anymore (because what they are drinking isn't really milk, duh). huge difference between "walmart" and "super kalona". walmart shouldn't even be able to legally call what they sell, "milk", IMO.
We have been lucky to find a farm (collection of farms, really) in a nearby town that sells raw milk, eggs, and meat. They deliver once a week. I have decided to order milk and eggs on a regular basis, both because I prefer raw milk and "real" eggs, and to support local farmers.
We are fortunate to have a really good Jersey raw milk supplier within 15 min drive. 24hr self service. Recently they raised prices in an effort to keep up. My wife suggested we scale back our milk consumption as a result. I countered with I would rather cut back on Amazon, Walmart, China inc, etc rather than cut back on a local provider...and rather than cut back actually scale up our consumption (probably better nutrition to boot if the younger boys are any indication - 12 yr old is 220 and inch taller than me...his 14 yr old brother is 260 and took 3rd in state wrestling champ last fall; his 2nd year wrestling...both of them surpass their 17 yr old brother who didn't go through the growth spurt on raw milk).

We have cut our chickens down from 400 to just over a 100. Quit selling eggs although we are still trading with a neighbor for beef. Peddling eggs was never economical but after 3 yrs decided to give it up. Now we incubate and sell chicks. See how long that lasts in the current environment...
Smart. Selling chicks is going to go boom before it goes bust - they can't keep them in stock around here. As long as you're not living in a state that is freaked out about bird flu, I think selling chicks is going to become more and more profitable. Everyone I know is "building their flock". We're probably doing it "prematurely", since we are not living at the cabin yet, but I'm pretty sure waiting till next year is the wrong attitude at this point - might not even be able to get them at all by this time next year.

We weren't going to put in a garden this year either, but the neighbor offered to plow it for free, and well, as my other neighbor said, "if it's free, it's for me". Anyway, it's a tiny tiny garden - 20x20. just something to keep our hands dirty.

And on that - there's only so much daylight each day. I have a full-time job that pays well, so I turn around and buy building supplies with that money, which are getting very spendy very quickly. I ask myself all the time, "is it time to pay attention to the garden, or get this place move-in ready so I'm not driving 30 minutes each way to work on it every day?" I figure the latter is the most important thing to do. I really don't think there's much time left at this point. All signs in my brain are flashing, "Crash this year!".
According to Rockefeller Foundation ceo (Rajiv)….we have 6 months before it gets rough…for whatever that’s worth…but if you know Rajiv’s history you know he’s been at the center of all things evil…

I’m with ya!

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Re: Log Cabins

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Sanded and poly'ed a door frame tonight: https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... oor_frame/

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Re: Log Cabins

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https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... ll_wiring/

wired one wall in the kitchen today. Glad that’s over with. Actually still need a switch for the disposal, so I’ll have to drill one more hole, lol.

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Re: Log Cabins

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https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... ain_panel/

I have no prior A/C electrical experience, but I am a certified premise (low voltage) wiring technician (phone company) with 17 years experience with phone cable. Hopefully, that background transfers over to passing inspection here...

200 amp panel, reserving 80 amps for the future garage for the welding equipment and other high draw tools like a table saw, etc.

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Re: Log Cabins

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One of my LHBA friends working on his second build. sold the first one in Indiana, I think; now he's in Idaho with a nice piece of property stacking logs on build #2 (the coolest part of the build):

http://jandjloghome.blogspot.com/

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Cruiserdude
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Re: Log Cabins

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mudflap wrote: May 19th, 2022, 8:33 am https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... poly_logs/

Huge task started...
😎👌

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Great8
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Re: Log Cabins

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I have been looking for a home builder in Star Valley, WY for two years. If someone here, has the qualifications to build a log cabin, let me know.

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Re: Log Cabins

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Great8 wrote: May 20th, 2022, 2:57 pm I have been looking for a home builder in Star Valley, WY for two years. If someone here, has the qualifications to build a log cabin, let me know.
I guess I do, but I'm in Alabama. The method I'm using is geared toward the DIY'er, and we probably going to finish it and move in for $20 - I don't know how you could build anything cheaper than that, much less a log home. That said, I know a guy who builds for a living - and he's LDS:

https://wileyloghomes.com/

not sure what his completed builds count is lately, but it's probably close to 100 - all over the usa. He can do the whole thing, or just do design work, or something in the middle. I think most people who hire him have him do the shell - foundation, stack logs, get the roof on and the windows in - then they either hire contractors to finish it (framing, electric, plumbing, etc.)or they finish it themselves. I've seen him get them dried in in 10 days with a crew of 3. You won't find a stronger or better built or more maintenance free log home than an LHBA home. and if you DIY, you won't find a cheaper one.

random pic from last night:

Image

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Cruiserdude
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Re: Log Cabins

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mudflap wrote: June 3rd, 2022, 10:45 am
Great8 wrote: May 20th, 2022, 2:57 pm I have been looking for a home builder in Star Valley, WY for two years. If someone here, has the qualifications to build a log cabin, let me know.
I guess I do, but I'm in Alabama. The method I'm using is geared toward the DIY'er, and we probably going to finish it and move in for $20 - I don't know how you could build anything cheaper than that, much less a log home. That said, I know a guy who builds for a living - and he's LDS:

https://wileyloghomes.com/

not sure what his completed builds count is lately, but it's probably close to 100 - all over the usa. He can do the whole thing, or just do design work, or something in the middle. I think most people who hire him have him do the shell - foundation, stack logs, get the roof on and the windows in - then they either hire contractors to finish it (framing, electric, plumbing, etc.)or they finish it themselves. I've seen him get them dried in in 10 days with a crew of 3. You won't find a stronger or better built or more maintenance free log home than an LHBA home. and if you DIY, you won't find a cheaper one.

random pic from last night:

Image
Looking good. I like the nice big overhanging roof as it truly helps protect the sides of the home long term👍. I've been noticing more and more of modern homes have smaller and smaller overhanging roofs. I'm not a fan of that at all. Nice big overhang really protects the home long term

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Re: Log Cabins

Post by mudflap »

yeah, me too - ours has 8 feet up front, and 9 feet in the back.

cookie cutters have less than a foot, and I've seen some with just an inch or two of overhang - like this:

Image

yeah: "Vinyl will protect us!" no, it won't.

wife just approved my latest post: electrical - https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/20 ... lectrical/
Last edited by mudflap on June 3rd, 2022, 12:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Cruiserdude
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Re: Log Cabins

Post by Cruiserdude »

mudflap wrote: June 3rd, 2022, 12:26 pm you mean like this:

Image

?

yeah: "Vinyl will protect us!" no, it won't.

wife just approved my latest post: electrical - https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/20 ... lectrical/
EggZachary!

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Cruiserdude
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Location: Wasatch front

Re: Log Cabins

Post by Cruiserdude »

mudflap wrote: June 3rd, 2022, 12:26 pm yeah, me too - ours has 8 feet up front, and 9 feet in the back.

cookie cutters have less than a foot, and I've seen some with just an inch or two of overhang - like this:

Image

yeah: "Vinyl will protect us!" no, it won't.

wife just approved my latest post: electrical - https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/20 ... lectrical/
Awesome stuff on the electrical post. That ceiling fan and downrod look great.....Looks like we could be brothers hermano

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mudflap
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Re: Log Cabins

Post by mudflap »

https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... abin_pics/

showing all the major milestones/highlights, in chronological order

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Cruiserdude
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Re: Log Cabins

Post by Cruiserdude »

mudflap wrote: June 14th, 2022, 8:06 am https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... abin_pics/

showing all the major milestones/highlights, in chronological order
#lifegoals
Freaking awesome man😎

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Re: Log Cabins

Post by Momma J »

The pictures are an amazing testament to the sweat equity you have in your home. I also poked around and enjoyed your post on "Crazy inflation"

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