Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

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ripliancum
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Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by ripliancum »

Here are reason why the Mik maqs are remnants of the Nephite people.


http://bookofmormonevidence.blogspot.co ... visit.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

DesertWonderer
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by DesertWonderer »

The micmac "written language" was created by a French priest trying to give them some literacy. No native Americans North of present day Mexico had a written language--a clear requirement for a Nephite / Lamanaite civilization.

ripliancum
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by ripliancum »

DesertWonderer wrote:The micmac "written language" was created by a French priest trying to give them some literacy. No native Americans North of present day Mexico had a written language--a clear requirement for a Nephite / Lamanaite civilization.
The Mik Maq have Egyptian heirglyphs in the written language. When the French priest arrived he saw the Mik Maq Indians writing on birch bark.

See link

http://bookofmormonevidence.blogspot.co ... glyph.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

larsenb
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by larsenb »

DesertWonderer wrote:The micmac "written language" was created by a French priest trying to give them some literacy. No native Americans North of present day Mexico had a written language--a clear requirement for a Nephite / Lamanaite civilization.
If I had time, I'd look up the citations for my assertions.

The Mic Mac script was known from about the late 1600's. Barry Fell did a study showing a high correlation between this script and Egyptian hieroglyphics . . not merotic, not demotic.

He also recorded a Mic Mac chant that transliterated to being Ptolemaic Greek. And the translation made sense. Barry was a gifted linguist, yet worked as a professor of invertebrate zoology at Harvard University.

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andsmith0723
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by andsmith0723 »

tapirrider wrote:The Micmac are not remnants of the Nephites. Your reasoning is flawed. David, you have a wild imagination and you let it run unchecked, causing you to make absurd and fantastical claims. Such bananas doesn't help the LDS church.
Let me guess you are a proponent of the central America theory? It takes a million times more imagination and ignoring scripture to believe that. Stop letting your arrogance keep you from the truth.

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GrandMasterB
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

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ripliancum wrote:Here are reason why the Mik maqs are remnants of the Nephite people.


http://bookofmormonevidence.blogspot.co ... visit.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Mik maq patty wack give a dog a bone. This old Indian went rolling home.......which was in North America.

e-eye2.0
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by e-eye2.0 »

GrandMasterB wrote:
ripliancum wrote:Here are reason why the Mik maqs are remnants of the Nephite people.


http://bookofmormonevidence.blogspot.co ... visit.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Mik maq patty wack give a dog a bone. This old Indian went rolling home.......which was in North America.

HaHa - that was kind of funny...

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GrandMasterB
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by GrandMasterB »

e-eye2.0 wrote:
GrandMasterB wrote:
ripliancum wrote:Here are reason why the Mik maqs are remnants of the Nephite people.


http://bookofmormonevidence.blogspot.co ... visit.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Mik maq patty wack give a dog a bone. This old Indian went rolling home.......which was in North America.

HaHa - that was kind of funny...
I am just in one of those moods today. Lol.

tapirrider
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by tapirrider »

andsmith0723 wrote:
tapirrider wrote:The Micmac are not remnants of the Nephites. Your reasoning is flawed. David, you have a wild imagination and you let it run unchecked, causing you to make absurd and fantastical claims. Such bananas doesn't help the LDS church.
Let me guess you are a proponent of the central America theory? It takes a million times more imagination and ignoring scripture to believe that. Stop letting your arrogance keep you from the truth.
No, I am not a proponent of the central American theory.

DesertWonderer
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by DesertWonderer »

larsenb wrote:
DesertWonderer wrote:The micmac "written language" was created by a French priest trying to give them some literacy. No native Americans North of present day Mexico had a written language--a clear requirement for a Nephite / Lamanaite civilization.
If I had time, I'd look up the citations for my assertions.

The Mic Mac script was known from about the late 1600's. Barry Fell did a study showing a high correlation between this script and Egyptian hieroglyphics . . not merotic, not demotic.

He also recorded a Mic Mac chant that transliterated to being Ptolemaic Greek. And the translation made sense. Barry was a gifted linguist, yet worked as a professor of invertebrate zoology at Harvard University.
VERY loose with the facts..but that's usually what I see from the Wayne May crowd.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mi%27kmaq ... ic_writing" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Mi'kmaq hieroglyphic writing was a writing system and memory aid used by the Mi'kmaq, a First Nations people of the east coast of Canada.

The missionary-era glyphs were logograms, with phonetic elements used alongside (Schmidt & Marshall 1995), which included logographic, alphabetic, and ideographic information.[citation needed] They were derived from a pictograph and petroglyph tradition.[1] In Mi'kmaq the glyphs are called komqwejwi'kasikl, or "sucker-fish writings", which refers to the tracks the sucker fish leaves on the muddy river bottom.

Contents [hide]
1 Classification
2 History
3 Examples
4 See also
5 References
6 Bibliography
7 External links
Classification[edit]
Scholars have debated whether the earliest known Mi'kmaq "hieroglyphs" from the 17th century qualified fully as a writing system, rather than as a pictographic mnemonic device. In the 17th century, French missionary Chrétien Le Clercq adapted the Míkmaq characters as a logographic system for pedagogical purposes.

In 1978, Ives Goddard and William Fitzhugh of the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution, contended that the pre-missionary system was purely mnemonic, as it could not be used to write new compositions. Schmidt and Marshall argued in 1995 that the missionary system of the 17th century was able to serve as a fully functional writing system. This would mean that Mi'kmaq is the oldest writing system for a native language north of Mexico.

History[edit]
Father Le Clercq, a Roman Catholic missionary on the Gaspé Peninsula in New France from 1675, claimed that he had seen some Míkmaq children 'writing' symbols on birchbark as a memory aid. This was sometimes done by pressing porcupine quills directly into the bark in the shape of symbols. Le Clercq adapted those symbols to writing prayers, developing new symbols as necessary.

This adapted writing system proved popular among Mi'kmaq, and was still in use in the 19th century. Since there is no historical or archaeological evidence of these symbols from before the arrival of this missionary, it is unclear how ancient the use of the mnemonic glyphs was. The relationship of these symbols with Mi'kmaq petroglyphs is also unclear.

Pierre Maillard, Roman Catholic priest, during the winter of 1737–38[2] perfected a system of hieroglyphics to transcribe Mi'kmaq words. He used these symbols to write formulas for the principal prayers and the responses of the faithful, in the catechism, so his followers might learn them more readily. In this development he was greatly aided by Jean-Louis Le Loutre, another French missionary. There is no direct evidence that Maillard was aware of Le Clercq's work; in any event Maillard's work is outstanding in that he left numerous works in the language, which continued in use among the Mi'kmaq into the 20th century.[3][4]

An unknown number of birch scrolls containing mi'kmaw writings were destroyed by missionaries in New England, before the writing system was adapted to aid conversion of community members to Christianity.

ripliancum
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Posts: 178

Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by ripliancum »

DesertWonderer wrote:
larsenb wrote:
DesertWonderer wrote:The micmac "written language" was created by a French priest trying to give them some literacy. No native Americans North of present day Mexico had a written language--a clear requirement for a Nephite / Lamanaite civilization.
If I had time, I'd look up the citations for my assertions.

The Mic Mac script was known from about the late 1600's. Barry Fell did a study showing a high correlation between this script and Egyptian hieroglyphics . . not merotic, not demotic.

He also recorded a Mic Mac chant that transliterated to being Ptolemaic Greek. And the translation made sense. Barry was a gifted linguist, yet worked as a professor of invertebrate zoology at Harvard University.
VERY loose with the facts..but that's usually what I see from the Wayne May crowd.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mi%27kmaq ... ic_writing" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Mi'kmaq hieroglyphic writing was a writing system and memory aid used by the Mi'kmaq, a First Nations people of the east coast of Canada.

The missionary-era glyphs were logograms, with phonetic elements used alongside (Schmidt & Marshall 1995), which included logographic, alphabetic, and ideographic information.[citation needed] They were derived from a pictograph and petroglyph tradition.[1] In Mi'kmaq the glyphs are called komqwejwi'kasikl, or "sucker-fish writings", which refers to the tracks the sucker fish leaves on the muddy river bottom.

Contents [hide]
1 Classification
2 History
3 Examples
4 See also
5 References
6 Bibliography
7 External links
Classification[edit]
Scholars have debated whether the earliest known Mi'kmaq "hieroglyphs" from the 17th century qualified fully as a writing system, rather than as a pictographic mnemonic device. In the 17th century, French missionary Chrétien Le Clercq adapted the Míkmaq characters as a logographic system for pedagogical purposes.

In 1978, Ives Goddard and William Fitzhugh of the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution, contended that the pre-missionary system was purely mnemonic, as it could not be used to write new compositions. Schmidt and Marshall argued in 1995 that the missionary system of the 17th century was able to serve as a fully functional writing system. This would mean that Mi'kmaq is the oldest writing system for a native language north of Mexico.

History[edit]
Father Le Clercq, a Roman Catholic missionary on the Gaspé Peninsula in New France from 1675, claimed that he had seen some Míkmaq children 'writing' symbols on birchbark as a memory aid. This was sometimes done by pressing porcupine quills directly into the bark in the shape of symbols. Le Clercq adapted those symbols to writing prayers, developing new symbols as necessary.

This adapted writing system proved popular among Mi'kmaq, and was still in use in the 19th century. Since there is no historical or archaeological evidence of these symbols from before the arrival of this missionary, it is unclear how ancient the use of the mnemonic glyphs was. The relationship of these symbols with Mi'kmaq petroglyphs is also unclear.

Pierre Maillard, Roman Catholic priest, during the winter of 1737–38[2] perfected a system of hieroglyphics to transcribe Mi'kmaq words. He used these symbols to write formulas for the principal prayers and the responses of the faithful, in the catechism, so his followers might learn them more readily. In this development he was greatly aided by Jean-Louis Le Loutre, another French missionary. There is no direct evidence that Maillard was aware of Le Clercq's work; in any event Maillard's work is outstanding in that he left numerous works in the language, which continued in use among the Mi'kmaq into the 20th century.[3][4]

An unknown number of birch scrolls containing mi'kmaw writings were destroyed by missionaries in New England, before the writing system was adapted to aid conversion of community members to Christianity.
Does central or South America offer a comparable tribe.

DesertWonderer
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by DesertWonderer »

^^^I don't understand this question. Please re-state it. Thanks.

ripliancum
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by ripliancum »

DesertWonderer wrote:^^^I don't understand this question. Please re-state it. Thanks.
Is there a tribe in central or South America that has Hebrew cultural linguistic and Middle East DNA.

DesertWonderer
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Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by DesertWonderer »

ripliancum wrote:
DesertWonderer wrote:^^^I don't understand this question. Please re-state it. Thanks.
Is there a tribe in central or South America that has Hebrew cultural linguistic and Middle East DNA.
Got it; OK, Thanks,

No but let me explain...Mesoamerica (southern MX and Guatemala), where I tend to think the BoM took place, is not in Central or South America. It is in North America just the southern end of it. It seems the US-BoM group doesn't understand basic geography. In Mesoamerica, yes, there is significant evidence of Hebrew cultural & linguistics.

The DNA evidence that you tout is flawed. Read The Church's essay on DNA and the BoM for an explanation. Ultimately The Churh's essay states that there is no DNA evidence to support or refute the BoM. May or Meldrum or from whomever you are getting your info is purposefully misleading people to sell books and DVD's.


.

ripliancum
captain of 100
Posts: 178

Re: Christ visit to Mik Maq Indians

Post by ripliancum »

DesertWonderer wrote:
ripliancum wrote:
DesertWonderer wrote:^^^I don't understand this question. Please re-state it. Thanks.
Is there a tribe in central or South America that has Hebrew cultural linguistic and Middle East DNA.
Got it; OK, Thanks,

No but let me explain...Mesoamerica (southern MX and Guatemala), where I tend to think the BoM took place, is not in Central or South America. It is in North America just the southern end of it. It seems the US-BoM group doesn't understand basic geography. In Mesoamerica, yes, there is significant evidence of Hebrew cultural & linguistics.

The DNA evidence that you tout is flawed. Read The Church's essay on DNA and the BoM for an explanation. Ultimately The Churh's essay states that there is no DNA evidence to support or refute the BoM. May or Meldrum or from whomever you are getting your info is purposefully misleading people to sell books and DVD's.


.
no the dna matches up extremely well with haplo group x dna distribution and cultural and linguistic applications. Scientist need to revise there data to match up with current data of dna. Current dna and cultural data does not match up with current world migration theories.

“The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations today descend from this one group of adventurous founders. But now there’s a kink in that theory.”

“If Aleutian Islanders or their ancestors had somehow mixed with an Australasian group up north or made their way south to the Amazon, they’d leave genetic clues along the way. “It’s not a clear alternative,” argues Reich.”

“Three Amazonian groups—Suruí, Karitiana and Xavante—all had more in common with Australasians than any group in Siberia.”

“Both studies therefore suggest that the ancestry of the first Americans is a lot more complicated than scientists had envisioned.”

“There is a greater diversity of Native American founding populations than previously thought,” says Skoglund. “And these founding populations connect indigenous groups in far apart places of the world.”

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n ... 76/?no-ist" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
In the place you think the Book of Mormon took place do you know of a comparable tribe to the MIK Maqs.

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