What are your thoughts on Easter?

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eddie
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What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by eddie »

As we approach the Easter season, my thoughts are on the resurrection of the Lord, Jesus Christ.

" That we will always remember Him," do we truly know Him?

“When I find myself drawn away from my priesthood duties by other interests and when my body begs for rest, I give to myself this rallying cry: “Remember Him.” The Lord is our perfect example of diligence in priesthood service. He is our captain. He called us. He goes before us. He chose us to follow Him and bring others with us. This evening I remember Him, and it stirs my heart. This is the Saturday night before Easter Sunday, when we remember His resurrection. I remember His example in the days before. Out of love for His father and for us, He alowed Himself to suffer beyond the capacity of mortal man.” Henry B. Eyring

“And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.” (John 17:3.)

“I believe that none of us can conceive the full import of what Christ did for us in Gethsemane, but I am grateful every day of my life for His atoning sacrifice in our behalf." Thomas S. Monson

David A. Bednar
"The Savior has suffered not just for our iniquities but also for the inequality, the unfairness, the pain, the anguish, and the emotional distresses that so frequently beset us. There is no physical pain, no anguish of soul, no suffering of spirit, no infirmity or weakness that you or I ever experience during our mortal journey that the Savior did not experience first. You and I in a moment of weakness may cry out, “No one understands. No one knows.” No human being, perhaps, knows. But the Son of God perfectly knows and understands, for He felt and bore our burdens before we ever did. And because He paid the ultimate price and bore that burden, He has perfect empathy and can extend to us His arm of mercy in so many phases of our life. He can reach out, touch, succor—literally run to us—and strengthen us to be more than we could ever be and help us to do that which we could never do through relying upon only our own power."

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Craig Johnson
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Craig Johnson »

Am so grateful to know that He is supreme goodness. To know there is no flaw. There is only perfect light. We can trust Him and do all that He commands with perfect assurance. Because of Him our lives are and have meaning and we can move forward. To obey Him is to experience joy and success. He pleads for us. He blesses us. He loves us.

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Durzan
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Durzan »

My thoughts are as simple as realizing that doing Easter Egg hunts always invariably leads to the smell of rotten eggs. I do like decorating them, though.

<Insert metaphor about the eggs somehow representing Christ's Resurrection/Atonement.>

I'd actually write that out, but my mind is usually fuzzy on this kind of thing.

I do love Christ though.

Fiannan
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Fiannan »

A great Pagan holiday to celebrate Ishtar and Inanna. The eggs and bunnies tie in with fertility festivals.

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Durzan
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Durzan »

The real question is what holidays has the LORD asked us to observe, if any, in this Dispensation? I know when the Israelites had the Law of Moses, they had religious holidays...

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captainfearnot
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by captainfearnot »

Durzan wrote: March 26th, 2018, 11:52 am The real question is what holidays has the LORD asked us to observe, if any, in this Dispensation? I know when the Israelites had the Law of Moses, they had religious holidays...
That would be none. LDS do not recognize a liturgical calendar at all. We celebrate the major Christian holidays along with our fellow Christians, but that is a cultural observance, not a religious one. We no longer recognize any feasts, masses, or —tides.

That's why the biggest holiday in American Mormonism is Mother's Day—a 20th Century invention—and we celebrate things like Halloween with a tenuous religious connection at best. It's all about the culture we live in.

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iWriteStuff
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by iWriteStuff »

captainfearnot wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:01 pm
Durzan wrote: March 26th, 2018, 11:52 am The real question is what holidays has the LORD asked us to observe, if any, in this Dispensation? I know when the Israelites had the Law of Moses, they had religious holidays...
That would be none. LDS do not recognize a liturgical calendar at all. We celebrate the major Christian holidays along with our fellow Christians, but that is a cultural observance, not a religious one. We no longer recognize any feasts, masses, or —tides.

That's why the biggest holiday in American Mormonism is Mother's Day—a 20th Century invention—and we celebrate things like Halloween with a tenuous religious connection at best. It's all about the culture we live in.
I cringed when the ward planned a Valentine's Day dance for the adults. To me, holidays are contrived excuses for consumerism. What they've done to Christmas is downright shameful to me. But I'm probably the exception on that point.
holiday cat.jpg
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Easter Bunny notwithstanding, I love celebrating the Lord's resurrection! :)

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Robin Hood
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Robin Hood »

My thoughts on Easter centre mostly around chocolate.

As far as I'm concerned Jesus told us exactly what he wanted us to do in remembrance of him, and we do it nearly every Sunday.

Easter was a well established pagan celebration in biblical times (it's even mentioned in the NT) and, like Christmas, I personally feel no need to celebrate it.
I don't object to others doing so.

eddie
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by eddie »

Wow, you guys are bummers! 😄🌷🐰

Gage
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Gage »

Easter- when thousands of mothers and daughters fill the churches wearing their new dresses.

brianj
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by brianj »

Fiannan wrote: March 26th, 2018, 11:21 am A great Pagan holiday to celebrate Ishtar and Inanna. The eggs and bunnies tie in with fertility festivals.
Ishtar and Inanna are one and the same, and neither has anything to do with Easter. A well known idiot atheist was stupid enough to assume and publish the idea that, since the English transliterations of Ishtar and Easter are similar, they are related. He was quickly humiliated by people who know better.

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Sirocco
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Sirocco »

iWriteStuff wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:10 pm
captainfearnot wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:01 pm
Durzan wrote: March 26th, 2018, 11:52 am The real question is what holidays has the LORD asked us to observe, if any, in this Dispensation? I know when the Israelites had the Law of Moses, they had religious holidays...
That would be none. LDS do not recognize a liturgical calendar at all. We celebrate the major Christian holidays along with our fellow Christians, but that is a cultural observance, not a religious one. We no longer recognize any feasts, masses, or —tides.

That's why the biggest holiday in American Mormonism is Mother's Day—a 20th Century invention—and we celebrate things like Halloween with a tenuous religious connection at best. It's all about the culture we live in.
I cringed when the ward planned a Valentine's Day dance for the adults. To me, holidays are contrived excuses for consumerism. What they've done to Christmas is downright shameful to me. But I'm probably the exception on that point.

holiday cat.jpg



Easter Bunny notwithstanding, I love celebrating the Lord's resurrection! :)
Valentines day makes me mad, less because I am single and more because I don't like candy. :?

eddie
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by eddie »

Sirocco wrote: March 27th, 2018, 8:11 pm
iWriteStuff wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:10 pm
captainfearnot wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:01 pm
Durzan wrote: March 26th, 2018, 11:52 am The real question is what holidays has the LORD asked us to observe, if any, in this Dispensation? I know when the Israelites had the Law of Moses, they had religious holidays...
That would be none. LDS do not recognize a liturgical calendar at all. We celebrate the major Christian holidays along with our fellow Christians, but that is a cultural observance, not a religious one. We no longer recognize any feasts, masses, or —tides.

That's why the biggest holiday in American Mormonism is Mother's Day—a 20th Century invention—and we celebrate things like Halloween with a tenuous religious connection at best. It's all about the culture we live in.
I cringed when the ward planned a Valentine's Day dance for the adults. To me, holidays are contrived excuses for consumerism. What they've done to Christmas is downright shameful to me. But I'm probably the exception on that point.

holiday cat.jpg



Easter Bunny notwithstanding, I love celebrating the Lord's resurrection! :)
Valentines day makes me mad, less because I am single and more because I don't like candy. :?
Haven't heard form you in awhile Sirocco, I hope all is well!

eddie
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by eddie »

iWriteStuff wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:10 pm
captainfearnot wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:01 pm
Durzan wrote: March 26th, 2018, 11:52 am The real question is what holidays has the LORD asked us to observe, if any, in this Dispensation? I know when the Israelites had the Law of Moses, they had religious holidays...
That would be none. LDS do not recognize a liturgical calendar at all. We celebrate the major Christian holidays along with our fellow Christians, but that is a cultural observance, not a religious one. We no longer recognize any feasts, masses, or —tides.

That's why the biggest holiday in American Mormonism is Mother's Day—a 20th Century invention—and we celebrate things like Halloween with a tenuous religious connection at best. It's all about the culture we live in.
I cringed when the ward planned a Valentine's Day dance for the adults. To me, holidays are contrived excuses for consumerism. What they've done to Christmas is downright shameful to me. But I'm probably the exception on that point.

holiday cat.jpg



Easter Bunny notwithstanding, I love celebrating the Lord's resurrection! :)
There are worse things than Holidays!
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Sirocco
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Sirocco »

eddie wrote: March 28th, 2018, 12:17 am
Sirocco wrote: March 27th, 2018, 8:11 pm
iWriteStuff wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:10 pm
captainfearnot wrote: March 26th, 2018, 12:01 pm
That would be none. LDS do not recognize a liturgical calendar at all. We celebrate the major Christian holidays along with our fellow Christians, but that is a cultural observance, not a religious one. We no longer recognize any feasts, masses, or —tides.

That's why the biggest holiday in American Mormonism is Mother's Day—a 20th Century invention—and we celebrate things like Halloween with a tenuous religious connection at best. It's all about the culture we live in.
I cringed when the ward planned a Valentine's Day dance for the adults. To me, holidays are contrived excuses for consumerism. What they've done to Christmas is downright shameful to me. But I'm probably the exception on that point.

holiday cat.jpg



Easter Bunny notwithstanding, I love celebrating the Lord's resurrection! :)
Valentines day makes me mad, less because I am single and more because I don't like candy. :?
Haven't heard form you in awhile Sirocco, I hope all is well!
I pine over a woman and that is never good.
Other then that things are okay, have a job that sucks but it pays the bills.
Found a precious moments figurine at the thrift store, they always make me smile.

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Thinker
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Thinker »

I imagine Easter like a new year - new starts… seeing things with new eyes.

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Niemand
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Niemand »

All those moaning about Easter/Ishtar should refer to it by its old name of Pace.

randyps
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by randyps »

Easter has become an opportunity for me to teach and re-teach the life/death and purpose of Jesus Christ to my teenage daughters. Christmas will be the next time we gather to discuss the life/birth of Jesus. I am grateful that America and most the world recognize these two holidays, it adds a great amount of legitimacy when a big population recognize an event/cause.

Prior to my wife and kids leaving the church 7yrs ago Jesus and his gospel were taught every Sunday at church and a couple of other days throughout the week, FHE/Youth activity nights.

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ransomme
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by ransomme »

Mine were centered on Passover of Friday and how Christ fulfilled them perfectly this whole week.


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David13
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by David13 »

Gage wrote: March 26th, 2018, 1:15 pm Easter- when thousands of mothers and daughters fill the churches wearing their new dresses.

And Easter bonnets.

This was big with the Catholics. Once a year church attendance. To show off their new clothes.
dc

buffalo_girl
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by buffalo_girl »

(use your ad blocker if you choose to listen to this hymn. nothing more annoying than bursts of modern 'reality'.)
The Mother speaks again: "Though you cannot see my Son as he exists in heaven, hear at least how he was in body on earth. He was so fair of face that no one, not even someone very sad at heart, could see him face-to-face without being cheered at his sight. The righteous were cheered with spiritual comfort, but even the wicked found relief from the sorrow of the world for as long as they looked on him. For that reason, people who were sad used to say: 'Let us go and see Mary's son and at least find some relief as long as we are there.'

As I age and my body seems to lag far behind what I need and want to do, the promise of Christ's Resurrection is close to my heart and will. I love the testimonies found in scripture of those who saw, conversed, and ate with the Resurrected Savior - the Creator of All Things in Heaven and on Earth!

After the great devastation at His death - the People left on this continent witnessed Him over many days, conversed with Him, took the Sacrament with Him, and were healed by Him. Joseph Smith saw and conversed with Him, was even scolded by Him for being careless and light-minded.

There are wonderful stories of the Resurrected Christ appearing to other Nations of People.

One of my favorite accounts was given by a Lakota Holy Man, Black Elk. Seeing the devastation of his people during the decades of the late 19th century, he was given some hope for their futures by another Holy Man in the West who testified of the Messiah and taught the People to make and wear Holy Shirts. During a ceremony called "The Ghost Dance", Black Elk had a vision in which he was taught of the Messiah, witnessed Him and the future of his People on their Promised Land.
I saw the ridge again, and as I neared it there was a deep, rumbling sound, and out of it there leaped a flame. But I glided right over it. There were six villages ahead of me in the beautiful land that was all clear and green in living light. Over these in turn I glided, coming down on the south side of the sixth village. And as I touched the ground, twelve men were coming towards me, and they said: "Our Father, the two-legged chief, you shall see!"

Then they led me to the center of the circle where once more I saw the holy tree all full of leaves and blooming.

But that was not all I saw. Against the tree there was a man standing with arms held wide in front of him. I looked hard at him, and I could not tell what people he came from. He was not a Wasichu and he was not an Indian. His hair was long and hanging loose, and on the left side of his head he wore an eagle feather. His body was strong and good to see, and it was painted red. I tried to recognize him, but I could not make him out. He was a very fine-looking man.

While I was staring hard at him, his body began to change and became very beautiful with all colors of light, and around him there was light.

He spoke like singing: "My life is such that all earthly beings and growing things belong to me. Your father, the Great Spirit, has said this. You too must say this."

Then he went out like a light in a wind.

The twelve men who were there spoke: "Behold them! Your nation's life shall be such!"

I saw again how beautiful the day was — the sky all blue and full of yellow light above the greening earth. And I saw that all the people were beautiful and young. There were no old ones there, nor children either — just people of about one age, and beautiful.
.
Another witness of the Resurrected Christ is depicted in a painting by Russian painter, Mikhail Nesterov, from the early 1900's. The People of far northern Russia near the White Sea across from Finland tell of Christ appearing to their ancestors.
Image

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BeNotDeceived
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by BeNotDeceived »

buffalo_girl wrote: April 18th, 2022, 12:11 pm While I was staring hard at him, his body began to change and became very beautiful with all colors of light, and around him there was light ...

I saw again how beautiful the day was — the sky all blue and full of yellow light above the greening earth.


Another witness of the Resurrected Christ is depicted in a painting by Russian painter, Mikhail Nesterov, from the early 1900's. The People of far northern Russia near the White Sea across from Finland tell of Christ appearing to their ancestors.
Image
The bit about the colors, reminded me about the many fine flying colors that I experienced, and how green and yellow are the central colors for a logo representing aviation. The screen capture below surprised me one day when I high-lighted GBNG wishing to see what Siri would show about it.
There is a linked replica of the my original OD posting in my Ghost, but not Goblin thread. Not many days later Moroni's Instrument would be landed by a 5.7 magnitude earthquake, and the subsequent timing pattern would skip silent H as Moroni ate it. This was the second of two timing patterns that today I nicknamed Shock and Awe, and anyone can see the both of them at march8miracle.org.

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Cruiserdude
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Cruiserdude »

buffalo_girl wrote: April 18th, 2022, 12:11 pm
(use your ad blocker if you choose to listen to this hymn. nothing more annoying than bursts of modern 'reality'.)
The Mother speaks again: "Though you cannot see my Son as he exists in heaven, hear at least how he was in body on earth. He was so fair of face that no one, not even someone very sad at heart, could see him face-to-face without being cheered at his sight. The righteous were cheered with spiritual comfort, but even the wicked found relief from the sorrow of the world for as long as they looked on him. For that reason, people who were sad used to say: 'Let us go and see Mary's son and at least find some relief as long as we are there.'

As I age and my body seems to lag far behind what I need and want to do, the promise of Christ's Resurrection is close to my heart and will. I love the testimonies found in scripture of those who saw, conversed, and ate with the Resurrected Savior - the Creator of All Things in Heaven and on Earth!

After the great devastation at His death - the People left on this continent witnessed Him over many days, conversed with Him, took the Sacrament with Him, and were healed by Him. Joseph Smith saw and conversed with Him, was even scolded by Him for being careless and light-minded.

There are wonderful stories of the Resurrected Christ appearing to other Nations of People.

One of my favorite accounts was given by a Lakota Holy Man, Black Elk. Seeing the devastation of his people during the decades of the late 19th century, he was given some hope for their futures by another Holy Man in the West who testified of the Messiah and taught the People to make and wear Holy Shirts. During a ceremony called "The Ghost Dance", Black Elk had a vision in which he was taught of the Messiah, witnessed Him and the future of his People on their Promised Land.
I saw the ridge again, and as I neared it there was a deep, rumbling sound, and out of it there leaped a flame. But I glided right over it. There were six villages ahead of me in the beautiful land that was all clear and green in living light. Over these in turn I glided, coming down on the south side of the sixth village. And as I touched the ground, twelve men were coming towards me, and they said: "Our Father, the two-legged chief, you shall see!"

Then they led me to the center of the circle where once more I saw the holy tree all full of leaves and blooming.

But that was not all I saw. Against the tree there was a man standing with arms held wide in front of him. I looked hard at him, and I could not tell what people he came from. He was not a Wasichu and he was not an Indian. His hair was long and hanging loose, and on the left side of his head he wore an eagle feather. His body was strong and good to see, and it was painted red. I tried to recognize him, but I could not make him out. He was a very fine-looking man.

While I was staring hard at him, his body began to change and became very beautiful with all colors of light, and around him there was light.

He spoke like singing: "My life is such that all earthly beings and growing things belong to me. Your father, the Great Spirit, has said this. You too must say this."

Then he went out like a light in a wind.

The twelve men who were there spoke: "Behold them! Your nation's life shall be such!"

I saw again how beautiful the day was — the sky all blue and full of yellow light above the greening earth. And I saw that all the people were beautiful and young. There were no old ones there, nor children either — just people of about one age, and beautiful.
.
Another witness of the Resurrected Christ is depicted in a painting by Russian painter, Mikhail Nesterov, from the early 1900's. The People of far northern Russia near the White Sea across from Finland tell of Christ appearing to their ancestors.
Image
Incredible stuff!!

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Niemand
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Re: What are your thoughts on Easter?

Post by Niemand »

buffalo_girl wrote: April 18th, 2022, 12:11 pmdepicted in a painting by Russian painter, Mikhail Nesterov, from the early 1900's. The People of far northern Russia near the White Sea across from Finland tell of Christ appearing to their ancestors.
Image
viewtopic.php?t=64059&p=1211540

I'm going to quote myself from a post I did earlier. Viracocha sounds like a vision of Christ to the South Americans, with some inevitable pagan corruption.
Niemand wrote: December 1st, 2021, 2:10 am Pardon me for quoting Wikipedia (I try and avoid it as it is all search engines point you to now)... but the article on Viracocha, the Inca deity is interesting. It does come with the usual caveats, "yes buts" and so on, but there are some apparent similarities between Viracocha and the godhead.

What follows is all quotation from Wikipedia. I've underlined sections of interest.
(Rest out of quote box, as it will just hide longer pieces)

---

Viracocha was one of the most important deities in the Inca pantheon and seen as the creator of all things, or the substance from which all things are created, and intimately associated with the sea.[2]

Viracocha created the universe, sun, moon, and stars, time (by commanding the sun to move over the sky)[3] and civilization itself. Viracocha was worshipped as god of the sun and of storms. He was represented as wearing the sun for a crown, with thunderbolts in his hands, and tears descending from his eyes as rain. In accord with the Inca cosmogony, Viracocha may be assimilated to Saturn, the "old god", the maker of time or "deus faber" (god maker), corresponding to the visible planet with the longest revolution around the sun.

According to a myth recorded by Juan de Betanzos,[5] Viracocha rose from Lake Titicaca (or sometimes the cave of Paqariq Tampu) during the time of darkness to bring forth light.[6] He made the sun, moon, and the stars. He made mankind by breathing into stones, but his first creation were brainless giants that displeased him. So, he destroyed them with a flood and made humans, beings who were better than the giants, from smaller stones. After creating them, they were scattered all over the world.[7]

Viracocha eventually disappeared across the Pacific Ocean (by walking on the water), and never returned. He wandered the earth disguised as a beggar, teaching his new creations the basics of civilization, as well as working numerous miracles. Many, however, refused to follow his teachings, devolving into warfare and delinquency; Viracocha wept when he saw the plight of the creatures he had created.[7] It was thought that Viracocha would re-appear in times of trouble. Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa wrote that Viracocha was described as "a man of medium height, white and dressed in a white robe like an alb secured round the waist and that he carried a staff and a book in his hands."

In one legend he had one son, Inti, and two daughters, Mama Killa and Pachamama. In this legend, he destroyed the people around Lake Titicaca with a Great Flood called Unu Pachakuti, lasting 60 days and 60 nights, saving two to bring civilization to the rest of the world. These two beings are Manco Cápac, the son of Inti (sometimes taken as the son of Viracocha), which name means "splendid foundation", and Mama Uqllu, which means "mother fertility". These two founded the Inca civilization carrying a golden staff, called 'tapac-yauri'. In another legend, he fathered the first eight civilized human beings. In some stories, he has a wife called Mama Qucha.

In another legend,[9] Viracocha had two sons, Imahmana Viracocha and Tocapo Viracocha. After the Great Flood and the Creation, Viracocha sent his sons to visit the tribes to the northeast and northwest to determine if they still obeyed his commandments. Viracocha traveled North. During their journey, Imaymana and Tocapo gave names to all the trees, flowers, fruits, and herbs. They also taught the tribes which of these were edible, which had medicinal properties, and which were poisonous. Eventually, Viracocha, Tocapo and Imahmana arrived at Cusco (in modern-day Peru) and the Pacific seacoast, where they walked away across the water until they disappeared. The word "Viracocha" literally means "Sea Foam."[9]

Tiqsi Huiracocha may have several meanings. In the Quechuan languages, tiqsi means foundation or base, wira means fat, and qucha means lake, sea, or reservoir.[10] Viracocha's many epithets include great, all knowing, powerful, etc. Some people state that Wiraqucha could mean "Fat (or foam) of the sea".[2][11]

-------

The first Spanish chroniclers from the 16th century made no mention of any identification with Viracocha. The first to do so was Pedro Cieza de León in 1553.[13] Similar accounts by Spanish chroniclers (e.g. Juan de Betanzos) describe Viracocha as a "white god", often with a beard.[14] The whiteness of Viracocha is however not mentioned in the native authentic legends of the Incas and most modern scholars therefore had considered the "white god" story to be a post-conquest Spanish invention.[15]

----

Spanish scholars and chroniclers provide many insights regarding the identity of Viracocha.

Bartolomé de las Casas states that viracocha means "creator of all things"[24]
Juan de Betanzos confirms the above in saying that "We may say that Viracocha is God"[25]
Polo, Sarmiento de Gamboa, Blas Valera and Acosta all reference Viracocha as a creator[24]
Guamán Poma, an indigenous chronicler, considers the term "viracocha" to be equivalent to "creator"[26]
Other authors such as Garcilaso de la Vega,[16] Betanzos, and Pedro de Quiroga[27] hold that Viracocha wasn't the original name of "God" for the Incas.[24] According to Garcilaso, the name of God in the language of the Incas was "Pachamama", not Viracocha.[28] Nevertheless, Spanish interpreters generally attributed the identity of supreme creator to Viracocha during the initial years of colonization.[24]

According to Antoinette Molinié Fioravanti, Spanish clergymen began to equate the "God of creation" with Viracocha in an attempt to combat the polytheistic worship of the Incas, which in their view was idolatrous. The existence of a "supreme God" in the Incan view was used by the clergy to demonstrate that the revelation of a single, universal God was "natural" for the human condition.[29]

Christian scholars such as Augustine of Hippo and Thomas Aquinas held that philosophers of all nations had learned of the existence of a supreme God.[30] Nevertheless, medieval European philosophy believed that without the aid of revelation, no one could fully understand such great truths such as the nature of "The Trinity".[24]

The decision to use the term "God" in place of "Viracocha" is seen as the first step in the evangelization of the Incas.[24] The reasoning behind this strategy includes the fact that it was likely difficult to explain the Christian idea of "God" to the Incas, who failed to understand the concept. In addition, replacing reference to Viracocha with "God" facilitated the substitution of the local concept of divinity with Christian theology.[24]

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