Adding to our supplies

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

I have been prompted to double the size of our garden in the country. My husband asked why? We will not be able to consume all that it provides.

I explained that we will be feeding others, as prompted by the spirit.

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Elizabeth
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Adding to our supplies

Post by Elizabeth »

Well done.

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Cruiserdude
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Cruiserdude »

Momma J wrote: ↑May 9th, 2023, 10:51 am My neighbors are asking what I am using for fertilizer. It is all the compost that I am making, which includes fun stuff like chicken poop, coffee grounds, fruit and veggie peels, leaves and grass... even chopped weeds if they have not gone to seed.

I am having better luck with chicken poop than cow manure. I decided to stay away from store bought cow manure this year due to the chemicals in hay. Hopefully, I can strike a deal with the big ranchers near me for clean manure.

The tomato in the picture weighed in at 1.1 lbs and is the sweetest tomato that I can remember eating!

I am learning some interesting things about squash; basically which grow best in our area and which we prefer to eat.

Learning that the squirrels will stay out of most of the garden if I leave them one tomato plant to "dine on." I still shoo them away when they sit on the fence and scold me, while eating one of my cherry tomatoes.

Chili powder has been a success in keeping the insect population from many of the plants. Caterpillars come in waves.... just need to check the plants on a regular basis. I have not seen any snails so far.

I set up habitat areas for toads and watering spots for bees. So far we have stayed a step ahead and have decent garden. I am able to gather everything for salads at least 5 days out of the week. I have brought in over 80 cucumbers to the office to share with co-workers. In a few weeks I will have a large surplus of tomatoes to share.

Now that I am getting the hang of it again......... I will work on gradually making larger beds.
Holy mackerel that tomato is huge!!! πŸ‘πŸ‘LookinG good momma J, keep it up!

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Harvesting cucumber, tomato, and radish seeds (so far). I need to let some of the squash grow larger so that I can set aside some squash seeds as well.

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Ymarsakar
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Ymarsakar »

While logickally people may wonder exactly what use is localized garden farming gonna do in the face of world wide (western) collapse or the satanic human leadership... well this is because it is a divine test. People get bonus points for succeeding with it and feeding themselves/others.

It can be enough to diminish the tribulations/evade them entirely, not only for you and your family, but those you choose to bring along/support (nepotism heh).

moving2zion
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by moving2zion »

Our family recently acquired all of the tools to do leatherworking. Now I need to find someone else that is willing to do the tanning, so I can get leather.
I had an interesting dream recently where I was shown a list of what each person would need to survive the coming crash. Each individual had a different list of course. Most of the things on my list I already had prepared, but two things for me personally stuck out, I was shown I should have 12 1 oz rounds of gold and a bag of silver. We have set aside silver for years, but the gold intrigued me. Why 12 1 oz rds? Could it be more symbolic? I have never cared much for gold, you can't eat it, shoot it, it's too large for most trades. What gold I have is in much smaller forms. 5 grams, 1/4 oz, etc. Food for thought.

moving2zion
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by moving2zion »

I've been looking at some EMP proof equipment. I did buy one of the grounding systems to put on my solar generator. I would like to get a few more if I can so I can protect my tractor and truck.

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Original_Intent
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Re: Adding to our supplies

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moving2zion wrote: ↑May 23rd, 2023, 10:29 am Our family recently acquired all of the tools to do leatherworking. Now I need to find someone else that is willing to do the tanning, so I can get leather.
I had an interesting dream recently where I was shown a list of what each person would need to survive the coming crash. Each individual had a different list of course. Most of the things on my list I already had prepared, but two things for me personally stuck out, I was shown I should have 12 1 oz rounds of gold and a bag of silver. We have set aside silver for years, but the gold intrigued me. Why 12 1 oz rds? Could it be more symbolic? I have never cared much for gold, you can't eat it, shoot it, it's too large for most trades. What gold I have is in much smaller forms. 5 grams, 1/4 oz, etc. Food for thought.
How many are in your family? does 12 divide equally among them? I have often felt that having a few gold is a good idea as it is highly concentrated wealth, 2 or 3 coins to each family member could be a lot of wealth if you need to move on foot. Silver is definitely preferable for typical trade, as you say gold is too valuable.
At current valuations I would still have a lot more ounces of silver than gold, but I understand the wisdom of some gold (silver is the much better bargain at this point) Gold covers just one more possible outcome.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

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One of my summertime goals this year with the garden experiments has been delivering a basket of produce to every house on our block. This is all coming from our little 15x20 foot garden in Houston; not the country cottage.

To date I have been able to deliver veggies to 7 of our neighbors, plus bring in several bags to share with co-workers. I Have 3 more homes to visit!

They have been paying us back with random acts of kindness, baked goodies, fresh spring rolls, tamales, and lumpia. Most importantly we are getting to know each other better! I am now helping a Korean family learn how to garden with East Texas obstacles. (heat... bugs... squirrels) This is turning out to be one of the best tools that I could have imagined for pulling people, with a plethora of backgrounds, together.

Side note: I have never had any luck growing zucchini here in Houston. I tried again this year and have big, beautiful plants with only a couple zucchini... So, I also I tried growing yellow crooked neck squash and have baskets full. We actually like the yellow squash better! Had the zucchini succeeded in previous attempts, I would have never tried other varieties.

I am grateful that I am taking the time to re-learn gardening. There are so many varieties of vegetables that I have never grown before. I am learning which grow well; which items are not worth the garden space; which vegetables I can stagger plant; which vegetables to grow together and which will choke out others. The best time and how much to water. Companion plants... bug deterrents. And (a first for me) how to harvest my own seeds!

It is very rewarding to pull an onion and a hand-full of carrots from the garden rather than running to the store. It is not only the convenience, but more so the taste and the knowledge that no chemicals are being ingested!

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RosyPosy
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by RosyPosy »

Momma J wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 5:12 am One of my summertime goals this year with the garden experiments has been delivering a basket of produce to every house on our block. This is all coming from our little 15x20 foot garden in Houston; not the country cottage.

To date I have been able to deliver veggies to 7 of our neighbors, plus bring in several bags to share with co-workers. I Have 3 more homes to visit!

They have been paying us back with random acts of kindness, baked goodies, fresh spring rolls, tamales, and lumpia. Most importantly we are getting to know each other better! I am now helping a Korean family learn how to garden with East Texas obstacles. (heat... bugs... squirrels) This is turning out to be one of the best tools that I could have imagined for pulling people, with a plethora of backgrounds, together.

Side note: I have never had any luck growing zucchini here in Houston. I tried again this year and have big, beautiful plants with only a couple zucchini... So, I also I tried growing yellow crooked neck squash and have baskets full. We actually like the yellow squash better! Had the zucchini succeeded in previous attempts, I would have never tried other varieties.

I am grateful that I am taking the time to re-learn gardening. There are so many varieties of vegetables that I have never grown before. I am learning which grow well; which items are not worth the garden space; which vegetables I can stagger plant; which vegetables to grow together and which will choke out others. The best time and how much to water. Companion plants... bug deterrents. And (a first for me) how to harvest my own seeds!

It is very rewarding to pull an onion and a hand-full of carrots from the garden rather than running to the store. It is not only the convenience, but more so the taste and the knowledge that no chemicals are being ingested!
Growing any type of squash is hard. Clearing bugs off the leaves is constant and pesticides only go so far.

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Fred
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Fred »

RosyPosy wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 11:03 am
Momma J wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 5:12 am One of my summertime goals this year with the garden experiments has been delivering a basket of produce to every house on our block. This is all coming from our little 15x20 foot garden in Houston; not the country cottage.

To date I have been able to deliver veggies to 7 of our neighbors, plus bring in several bags to share with co-workers. I Have 3 more homes to visit!

They have been paying us back with random acts of kindness, baked goodies, fresh spring rolls, tamales, and lumpia. Most importantly we are getting to know each other better! I am now helping a Korean family learn how to garden with East Texas obstacles. (heat... bugs... squirrels) This is turning out to be one of the best tools that I could have imagined for pulling people, with a plethora of backgrounds, together.

Side note: I have never had any luck growing zucchini here in Houston. I tried again this year and have big, beautiful plants with only a couple zucchini... So, I also I tried growing yellow crooked neck squash and have baskets full. We actually like the yellow squash better! Had the zucchini succeeded in previous attempts, I would have never tried other varieties.

I am grateful that I am taking the time to re-learn gardening. There are so many varieties of vegetables that I have never grown before. I am learning which grow well; which items are not worth the garden space; which vegetables I can stagger plant; which vegetables to grow together and which will choke out others. The best time and how much to water. Companion plants... bug deterrents. And (a first for me) how to harvest my own seeds!

It is very rewarding to pull an onion and a hand-full of carrots from the garden rather than running to the store. It is not only the convenience, but more so the taste and the knowledge that no chemicals are being ingested!
Growing any type of squash is hard. Clearing bugs off the leaves is constant and pesticides only go so far.
Depends on where you live. If a bug crawls out from cover, a bird swoops down and eats it, around here.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Fred wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 12:03 pm
RosyPosy wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 11:03 am
Momma J wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 5:12 am One of my summertime goals this year with the garden experiments has been delivering a basket of produce to every house on our block. This is all coming from our little 15x20 foot garden in Houston; not the country cottage.

To date I have been able to deliver veggies to 7 of our neighbors, plus bring in several bags to share with co-workers. I Have 3 more homes to visit!

They have been paying us back with random acts of kindness, baked goodies, fresh spring rolls, tamales, and lumpia. Most importantly we are getting to know each other better! I am now helping a Korean family learn how to garden with East Texas obstacles. (heat... bugs... squirrels) This is turning out to be one of the best tools that I could have imagined for pulling people, with a plethora of backgrounds, together.

Side note: I have never had any luck growing zucchini here in Houston. I tried again this year and have big, beautiful plants with only a couple zucchini... So, I also I tried growing yellow crooked neck squash and have baskets full. We actually like the yellow squash better! Had the zucchini succeeded in previous attempts, I would have never tried other varieties.

I am grateful that I am taking the time to re-learn gardening. There are so many varieties of vegetables that I have never grown before. I am learning which grow well; which items are not worth the garden space; which vegetables I can stagger plant; which vegetables to grow together and which will choke out others. The best time and how much to water. Companion plants... bug deterrents. And (a first for me) how to harvest my own seeds!

It is very rewarding to pull an onion and a hand-full of carrots from the garden rather than running to the store. It is not only the convenience, but more so the taste and the knowledge that no chemicals are being ingested!
Growing any type of squash is hard. Clearing bugs off the leaves is constant and pesticides only go so far.
Depends on where you live. If a bug crawls out from cover, a bird swoops down and eats it, around here.
I might be off track, but I ask people around here to take down the bird feeders. Stop throwing out old bread... etc. We are inundated with insects in East Texas. The birds will not go hungry if you stop putting out seeds. I encourage birds, frogs, toads, lizards, and beneficial insects to inhabit my garden.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

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RosyPosy wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 11:03 am
Growing any type of squash is hard. Clearing bugs off the leaves is constant and pesticides only go so far.
I am having pretty good luck with chili powder this year. I buy it in large containers and sprinkle it all around the plants.

JohnnyL
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JohnnyL »

Momma J wrote: ↑April 11th, 2023, 6:45 am I need to research the essential oils. Being very particular about encouraging bees. So far all veggies are being pollinated at a very good pace.

I have added pots of flowers and dishes of water ...

I have also added some toad houses after I found a few toads burrowed in the lettuce beds. I am very happy to see an abundance of little lizards helping me with the bugs.

Trying to stay ahead of the caterpillars... ugh

I have forgotten so much about gardening.... it is coming back... in little Aha!!! moments.

All tips welcome!
We've had bees every year, and some butterflies, but we actually have more wasps and similar stingers pollinating than anything else. I've even seen wasps and bees in the same flower. Blessedly/ fortunately, no one has gotten stung by anything (other than mosquitoes, lol).

JohnnyL
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JohnnyL »

HVDC wrote: ↑April 12th, 2023, 9:17 am
Momma J wrote: ↑April 12th, 2023, 5:24 am
Ymarsakar wrote: ↑April 11th, 2023, 8:25 am

That can be healed if he desires that trauma to be healed.

If he is willing to accept the trials and process that go along with it, the Christ and Godhead will create an opportunity for him. But he has to choose consciously and be serious about the work.

To be clear, this is an opportunity I offer to you and him. I am not speaking from platitudes or copied words. These are my own words and my own promise.
Thank you. I am open.

My husband's trials in phobia areas are a tough hurdle amplified by Parkinson's delusional paranoia. I chose my battles carefully and avoid stressors that destroy trust. Walking a tightrope in some areas.

Back to my garden... I have a fairly good grasp, via a constant vigilance on the insects.

Now I have squirrels mocking me as they sit on the fence eating tomatoes that they have recently stolen. I keep the garden completely fenced from the dogs, as they would trample in a frenzy to catch the squirrels.

I have tried chili powder, garlic, and vinegar... The squirrels are a bane.

It is a good thing I have planted in abundance this year.... but I had hoped to have more to share with neighbors.
Rat traps work on squirrels if they are not too big.

Have to screw them to boards and they only work a few times since they are smart; might not kill them outright. BB gun to the head will take care of that.

If you dont eat them, nail their carcasses to the fence to send a message.

Discourages two legged predators as well.

Commercial poison is avalible but I don't like using it normally; early Spring and late Fall.

Hit them hard, hit them early with everything you got; keeps the numbers down.

Good luck!

Sir H
My parents would drive them to the woods a long ways away... and like dogs and cats, they seemed to find their way back "home".

They do make stew in meager times...

JohnnyL
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JohnnyL »

Momma J wrote: ↑May 9th, 2023, 10:51 am My neighbors are asking what I am using for fertilizer. It is all the compost that I am making, which includes fun stuff like chicken poop, coffee grounds, fruit and veggie peels, leaves and grass... even chopped weeds if they have not gone to seed.

I am having better luck with chicken poop than cow manure. I decided to stay away from store bought cow manure this year due to the chemicals in hay. Hopefully, I can strike a deal with the big ranchers near me for clean manure.

The tomato in the picture weighed in at 1.1 lbs and is the sweetest tomato that I can remember eating!

I am learning some interesting things about squash; basically which grow best in our area and which we prefer to eat.

Learning that the squirrels will stay out of most of the garden if I leave them one tomato plant to "dine on." I still shoo them away when they sit on the fence and scold me, while eating one of my cherry tomatoes.

Chili powder has been a success in keeping the insect population from many of the plants. Caterpillars come in waves.... just need to check the plants on a regular basis. I have not seen any snails so far.

I set up habitat areas for toads and watering spots for bees. So far we have stayed a step ahead and have decent garden. I am able to gather everything for salads at least 5 days out of the week. I have brought in over 80 cucumbers to the office to share with co-workers. In a few weeks I will have a large surplus of tomatoes to share.

Now that I am getting the hang of it again......... I will work on gradually making larger beds.
Wow, this is all so awesome!!

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Original_Intent
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Original_Intent »

Bugs hate peppermint essential oil. We spray our yard for ticks and other pests with Vet's Best yard and kennel flea and tick spray, it's made a huge difference.

Here in Missouri, we have rabbits living under our deck and squirrels are everywhere, I am interested to see how the garden fares vs. them.

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RosyPosy
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by RosyPosy »

Momma J wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 2:35 pm
RosyPosy wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 11:03 am
Growing any type of squash is hard. Clearing bugs off the leaves is constant and pesticides only go so far.
I am having pretty good luck with chili powder this year. I buy it in large containers and sprinkle it all around the plants.
So you use it as a repellent?

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

JohnnyL wrote: ↑May 28th, 2023, 1:06 pm
Momma J wrote: ↑April 11th, 2023, 6:45 am I need to research the essential oils. Being very particular about encouraging bees. So far all veggies are being pollinated at a very good pace.

I have added pots of flowers and dishes of water ...

I have also added some toad houses after I found a few toads burrowed in the lettuce beds. I am very happy to see an abundance of little lizards helping me with the bugs.

Trying to stay ahead of the caterpillars... ugh

I have forgotten so much about gardening.... it is coming back... in little Aha!!! moments.

All tips welcome!
We've had bees every year, and some butterflies, but we actually have more wasps and similar stingers pollinating than anything else. I've even seen wasps and bees in the same flower. Blessedly/ fortunately, no one has gotten stung by anything (other than mosquitoes, lol).
At the country cottage we have an overabundance of mud daubers. I am guessing they are our primary pollinators. They leave us alone for the most part... bouncing off my head from time to time, but never stinging. It is fascinating watching them pick up spiders and drag them off.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

RosyPosy wrote: ↑May 29th, 2023, 5:54 pm
Momma J wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 2:35 pm
RosyPosy wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 11:03 am
Growing any type of squash is hard. Clearing bugs off the leaves is constant and pesticides only go so far.
I am having pretty good luck with chili powder this year. I buy it in large containers and sprinkle it all around the plants.
So you use it as a repellent?
Yes, as a repellant. I sprinkle it all over the place when bugs are out-pacing me.

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RosyPosy
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by RosyPosy »

Momma J wrote: ↑May 30th, 2023, 6:42 am
RosyPosy wrote: ↑May 29th, 2023, 5:54 pm
Momma J wrote: ↑May 25th, 2023, 2:35 pm I am having pretty good luck with chili powder this year. I buy it in large containers and sprinkle it all around the plants.
So you use it as a repellent?
Yes, as a repellant. I sprinkle it all over the place when bugs are out-pacing me.
Good thinking. Turns out I got HOA approval to plant a garden near my house.

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mudflap
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by mudflap »

A bit of a status update on our "not doing a garden this year" garden:

https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... this_year/


Image

oh, and the blueberries are fine.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

mudflap wrote: ↑June 2nd, 2023, 8:52 pm A bit of a status update on our "not doing a garden this year" garden:

https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... this_year/


Image

oh, and the blueberries are fine.
Great work on getting the "not doing a garden this year" garden started. I have been negligent on getting berries started.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

This not "adding to our supplies" but we are having a very old sweetgum tree removed. I am actually very sad to see it go as I love to plan my mornings under the branches.

Unfortunately, it is dropping branches at an alarming rate. The last branch hit the edge of the roof and smashed into our air condenser. The tree company sent a guy up into the tree to take videos for me. Saddened to see a big hole full of murky water, rotting out the trunk.

So, this is preemptive preparations at our country cottage.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

A co-worker just brought me 2 quarts of raw honey. A very sweet gift offered as a thanks for sharing my garden veggies!

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