Greetings, community!

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Dangerous rhetoric
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Greetings, community!

Post by Dangerous rhetoric »

I am a young man who has been faithful and orthodox my whole life, but I have been unable to drag myself to church or participate in any community for my whole adult life. I regularly pray and do a meager to earnest amount of scripture study, depending on lunar phases and astrological indicators.

I went to college for a year hoping to get published as an expert in math and cryptography. I ended up dropping out after I kept flunking classes that were taught primarily by socialists, the DEI politics became an issue of dignity violation for me, it was very inefficient for learning compared to what I could manage on my own, and a conviction in the need for independence and self-sufficiency meant I was also working jobs alongside school to pay rent and I frankly recognized the opportunity cost that goes with investing into the system that I think may have been at times a false idol for me up to that point-- chasing accolades in academia.

I didn't take the stimulus checks owing to a young adult libertarian view of it being a violation of principle to accept it, even as I had a minimum wage job in food service until the plague. I worked in Portland that summer commuting as a pedestrian alone in low daylight or at night, during the BLM protests as a white guy without any of the status symbols of intersectional unionization like earring studs or Hasanabi glasses. And I came to recognize that success in academia requires abandoning your values at some point to rent status and position, so since then I've been working jobs that really aren't fulfilling, nor will lead to increased prospects. I worked in commercial fishing, but I feel worse every day I see gasping fish beheaded and their kidneys removed, but the nature of the industry mandates a boot camp style employment for a season requiring 16 hour days and 7 day weeks. They don't like requests for religious accommodations, and I don't like asking for them, owing to a more lasseiz-faire sympathy to agreements between people (to a point). I can't really do it any more, despite it being 11k per month without strings attached, without a barrier to entry.

I'm trying to figure out where to go now. I'm a bit washed up, because I don't have sources of motivation to put effort into improving my skills.

I can't recover from a chronic pornography problem I've had and felt guilty over since 13. I was pushed into baptizing my brother unworthily with no way out but to tell my mom for a second time about it, and by extension my extended family and church network. The problem got to Hannibal Lecter level pretty fast. I made every effort to stop it since the first time I consciously decided to seek it out. But I'll say it's at least an effective narcotic.

At the very least, it seems like something I do feel I know about my calling in life is that I want to start a homestead and protect liberty by giving people alternatives like locally grown, certified Lupron-free produce and products at market prices backing the crypto economy.

I'm working on a hobby project in RTOS development for the Raspberry Pi (no website or prototype available for it yet) that can implement protocols that replace the design for what I consider to be backdoors masquerading as security protocols and useful services, such as SSL/TLS and certificate authorization, 2FA, proprietary firmware and CPU design, VPN services, centralized DNS registries and servers, and Javascript as a whole. I understand the basics of circuit analysis and complex analysis, out of practice as I may be.

I've never thought lower than I do now of licensing, certification, schooling, or elitism, so I'm sort of stuck with warehouse labor until I can save enough to move and start conducting commerce. I don't know how I can prove to others or myself without betraying my petty ire for titles and certifications that I'm doing something well enough to be trusted to do things for them, and I recognize there's a legitimate necessity to make sure licensing exists to prevent harm so the reputation of the industry as a minefield for consumers or a harm to the environment is preserved, but I have had really bad experiences with recruiting/HR types who seem to like being a gatekeeper for things people want; after what is happening with Jordan Peterson, we need alternative authorities to the first option and probably a softening entirely in requirements for licensing where possible. Apprenticeships seem nice, but you have to go to school and take classes that will appropriate funds from these classes that will fund an institution that guilt-trips people that men make more playing soccer than women for colleges or insist that women face undue barriers, underrepresentation, and a lack of role models to inspire a career in construction management. One would like to believe this is fringe campaigning, but people around me at rates of at least 15% of people I went to high school with and still hear of, are the types to promote provocative, aggressive rhetoric where they're perpetually angry about what's trending, including the late-term abortion stuff, joking about assassinating or harassing people, January 6th reruns, and the "book banning" issue that even I thought was beyond what I'd ever see even being accustomed to the last iteration of the education system. A lot of teachers and people I held in high regard seem to be ideological telemarketers at night in a way that seems to transcend what I expected.

Hats off to licensed professionals and teachers doing good work out there, too. I'm here looking for a bit of a morale boost and to get advice from a community familiar with the nature of the LDS mindset and with the conspiratorial stuff that nobody near me is too concerned about.

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creator
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Re: Greetings, community!

Post by creator »

Welcome, and thanks for introducing yourself.

In regards to your career path, there are plenty of jobs, especially in the tech industry (based on my experience), that won't require a certification or degree. As long as you're good at it, your experience will allow you to advance over time. It may just a be a little more difficult to find the right starting point.

And in regards to worthiness, guilt, and living your religion.. honestly, don't let it worry you too much. Focus on positive things like prayer and strengthening your connection to Christ, and serving others, and know that it will all work out. It's also not anyone else's business what your personal moral struggles are - that's between you and God. None of us are perfect, and you can experience joy and a spiritually connected life, despite weaknesses and challenges along the way. Also, your passion for truth is such a great strength to have.

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Dusty Wanderer
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Posts: 1458

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Dusty Wanderer »

Welcome to the forum, Dangerous Rhetoric.

I'm in the tech industry, as well. Even spent 5 years dedicated to information security, so I'm kind of geeking out about your cryptography experience. I'm also a Linux/UNIX aficionado from way back before your time, apparently, so your work on RTOS and RaspberryPI sounds interesting to me. Whatever you can do intellectually to keep those neurons firing is good for you.

Since you're willing to work warehouse jobs, etc, then you should be fine starting out in a technician or Helpdesk position with your experience and work up internally. That's the way I did it 20 or so years ago - started on a Helpdesk, then into systems and networking work, onto a development team, etc, to what I'm doing today. If you're patient and have a good attitude about learning everything you can wherever you're at, you'll excel.

And I second what creator says in regards to worthiness. I'd just add that intelligent minds don't do so well with downtime. Perhaps taking on a work or hobby/opensource project that challenges and stretches you intellectually will help fill in some of that vacuum, but not in a forced, moralizing crutch kind of way; just as something you'd prefer to be doing regardless.

Look forward to getting to know you around here.

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Original_Intent
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Posts: 13197

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Original_Intent »

If you are in or near SLC, I'd recommend checking out GlobalSim- Best company of my career, and I think your RasberryPi and other experience would be a really good fit. As a company, probably the smartest, hardest working but also fun people to work with. Even the lower end people, tech support and so forth are VERY smart with a wide range of skills.

Dangerous rhetoric
captain of 10
Posts: 27

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Dangerous rhetoric »

Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 14th, 2023, 7:56 pm Welcome to the forum, Dangerous Rhetoric.

I'm in the tech industry, as well. Even spent 5 years dedicated to information security, so I'm kind of geeking out about your cryptography experience. I'm also a Linux/UNIX aficionado from way back before your time, apparently, so your work on RTOS and RaspberryPI sounds interesting to me. Whatever you can do intellectually to keep those neurons firing is good for you.

Since you're willing to work warehouse jobs, etc, then you should be fine starting out in a technician or Helpdesk position with your experience and work up internally. That's the way I did it 20 or so years ago - started on a Helpdesk, then into systems and networking work, onto a development team, etc, to what I'm doing today. If you're patient and have a good attitude about learning everything you can wherever you're at, you'll excel.

And I second what creator says in regards to worthiness. I'd just add that intelligent minds don't do so well with downtime. Perhaps taking on a work or hobby/opensource project that challenges and stretches you intellectually will help fill in some of that vacuum, but not in a forced, moralizing crutch kind of way; just as something you'd prefer to be doing regardless.

Look forward to getting to know you around here.
I have an odd nostalgia for the tech industry before I was born because my math background draws me to want to derive solutions from the basics. Part of me wanted to develop for an old 16-bit IBM computer because it would be easier to flash and replace firmware and because primitive hardware would have more predictable and simpler behavior.

The Raspberry Pi, though, is close enough to ideal, and it's a scalable medium for a community project. Intel architecture is way too heavy for me to maintain a project for, and it took me finding 300 page manuals for each specific chipset on port-mapped i/o controls that got me to realize exactly what I got myself into.

I'll think about a help desk job. I've always assumed I was underqualified without a bachelor's for it and I haven't had much luck finding demand for that work before I stopped looking at it, but it's definitely up my alley.

Looking forward to seeing you around.

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Dusty Wanderer
captain of 1,000
Posts: 1458

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Dusty Wanderer »

Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 14th, 2023, 10:39 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 14th, 2023, 7:56 pm Welcome to the forum, Dangerous Rhetoric.

I'm in the tech industry, as well. Even spent 5 years dedicated to information security, so I'm kind of geeking out about your cryptography experience. I'm also a Linux/UNIX aficionado from way back before your time, apparently, so your work on RTOS and RaspberryPI sounds interesting to me. Whatever you can do intellectually to keep those neurons firing is good for you.

Since you're willing to work warehouse jobs, etc, then you should be fine starting out in a technician or Helpdesk position with your experience and work up internally. That's the way I did it 20 or so years ago - started on a Helpdesk, then into systems and networking work, onto a development team, etc, to what I'm doing today. If you're patient and have a good attitude about learning everything you can wherever you're at, you'll excel.

And I second what creator says in regards to worthiness. I'd just add that intelligent minds don't do so well with downtime. Perhaps taking on a work or hobby/opensource project that challenges and stretches you intellectually will help fill in some of that vacuum, but not in a forced, moralizing crutch kind of way; just as something you'd prefer to be doing regardless.

Look forward to getting to know you around here.
I have an odd nostalgia for the tech industry before I was born because my math background draws me to want to derive solutions from the basics. Part of me wanted to develop for an old 16-bit IBM computer because it would be easier to flash and replace firmware and because primitive hardware would have more predictable and simpler behavior.

The Raspberry Pi, though, is close enough to ideal, and it's a scalable medium for a community project. Intel architecture is way too heavy for me to maintain a project for, and it took me finding 300 page manuals for each specific chipset on port-mapped i/o controls that got me to realize exactly what I got myself into.

I'll think about a help desk job. I've always assumed I was underqualified without a bachelor's for it and I haven't had much luck finding demand for that work before I stopped looking at it, but it's definitely up my alley.

Looking forward to seeing you around.
I love the RaspberryPi. I've got one running Slackware, as we speak. So, are you building an RTOS from scratch to run on RPi or are you contributing to FreeRTOS or some other project? Curious what you plan on using an RTOS for? :-)

Yes, a few minutes on LinkedIn.com, Indeed.com, or Dice.com searching for "help desk", "help desk tech", or "data center", "data center tech". Are you coding in C or C++? What platform were you primarily doing your cryptography on - linux? You might even be able to find a something with "junior c c++" or "junior embedded programmer", etc. Anyway, good luck.

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Shawn Henry
captain of 1,000
Posts: 4821

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Shawn Henry »

Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 14th, 2023, 6:21 pm a meager to earnest amount of scripture study
Improve upon this my friend. Feasting upon the words of Christ is where it all starts.

Dangerous rhetoric
captain of 10
Posts: 27

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Dangerous rhetoric »

Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 15th, 2023, 11:29 am
Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 14th, 2023, 10:39 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 14th, 2023, 7:56 pm Welcome to the forum, Dangerous Rhetoric.

I'm in the tech industry, as well. Even spent 5 years dedicated to information security, so I'm kind of geeking out about your cryptography experience. I'm also a Linux/UNIX aficionado from way back before your time, apparently, so your work on RTOS and RaspberryPI sounds interesting to me. Whatever you can do intellectually to keep those neurons firing is good for you.

Since you're willing to work warehouse jobs, etc, then you should be fine starting out in a technician or Helpdesk position with your experience and work up internally. That's the way I did it 20 or so years ago - started on a Helpdesk, then into systems and networking work, onto a development team, etc, to what I'm doing today. If you're patient and have a good attitude about learning everything you can wherever you're at, you'll excel.

And I second what creator says in regards to worthiness. I'd just add that intelligent minds don't do so well with downtime. Perhaps taking on a work or hobby/opensource project that challenges and stretches you intellectually will help fill in some of that vacuum, but not in a forced, moralizing crutch kind of way; just as something you'd prefer to be doing regardless.

Look forward to getting to know you around here.
I have an odd nostalgia for the tech industry before I was born because my math background draws me to want to derive solutions from the basics. Part of me wanted to develop for an old 16-bit IBM computer because it would be easier to flash and replace firmware and because primitive hardware would have more predictable and simpler behavior.

The Raspberry Pi, though, is close enough to ideal, and it's a scalable medium for a community project. Intel architecture is way too heavy for me to maintain a project for, and it took me finding 300 page manuals for each specific chipset on port-mapped i/o controls that got me to realize exactly what I got myself into.

I'll think about a help desk job. I've always assumed I was underqualified without a bachelor's for it and I haven't had much luck finding demand for that work before I stopped looking at it, but it's definitely up my alley.

Looking forward to seeing you around.
I love the RaspberryPi. I've got one running Slackware, as we speak. So, are you building an RTOS from scratch to run on RPi or are you contributing to FreeRTOS or some other project? Curious what you plan on using an RTOS for? :-)

Yes, a few minutes on LinkedIn.com, Indeed.com, or Dice.com searching for "help desk", "help desk tech", or "data center", "data center tech". Are you coding in C or C++? What platform were you primarily doing your cryptography on - linux? You might even be able to find a something with "junior c c++" or "junior embedded programmer", etc. Anyway, good luck.
I'm developing in Arch-based Linux using assembly and QEMU for OS development. I'm implementing the tool chain from scratch so I know exactly how it works. The programming language compiler I build within it is blueprinted as a typeless spin-off of Lisp because it's the simplest syntax to implement a compiler for optimized high-level code for. There would barely be a need for documentation to an end user on the syntax itself. My strategy to reduce security risks is to reduce the instruction set and to prevent surprises and complexity.

The use for it started with a personal goal, but it's actually a liberty-centered project. I don't know if I can get it off the ground, but the dream is to use it as an alternative to Unix with the same philosophy.

I think the client should be able to specify the third party that certifies the server. It's weird that we have an elaborate process where businesses collect consumer requests in a way that can easily be subpoenaed or intercepted by a corporate entity. You can just as easily stop a middleman with a protocol using any server outside your local area network. But most sites won't allow you to connect without certifying the connection, HSTS, so you're forced to give up data to these same few people.

Likewise, duckduckgo was caught red-handed in kahoots with Microsoft. Every major search engine is the gatekeeper to what we see, and it's probably better that the paradigm is not that you choose from six, but rather that there's a custom algorithm that you want it to use. The reason social media like Tiktok, Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook can just poof to the top of the appstore is because they're on Firefox's or Edge's front page or the feds paid to secure them priority.

I want to develop a platform for the parallel economy that's explicitly safe against censorship, guarantees true peer-to-peer privacy is available, and that whatever software installer or web API exists, and has more user supervision and transparency than an auto shop that just tells you how much it'll cost and to come back when it's done.

Some of these things can be solved with userspace software, but I always know that if the surface level audit shows this many problems, I should just start over so I can put a libertarian stamp on the low level details of the project.

The biggest things that I want to achieve with it is to develop projects alongside it like pointing people to an economy that's like Craigslist, farmer's markets, or Etsy, where you pay with cryptocurrency, and to develop a server certification system with a client-specified certificate authority rather than a server-specified authority, and to have features that are fundamentally incompatible with our tech infrastructure or provide a useful transition to a platform that doesn't send Microsoft cookies from every street corner you pass.

I see that conservatives and libertarians are boiling for options to hop off of big tech, so I see a market here. Maybe a job in tech support would help me understand how to explain these things to the average person and eventually lead to a startup.

As for other programming for more algorithmic or prototyping uses, I use the C family and Python for everything. I'm not really a full-stack oficionado. I've only used Flask for front-end web development, Pygame/Qt for game development, and requests or curl for scraping. Now I'm at the point where it seems like more mainstream tools are becoming obsolete for me to learn because I don't see myself ending up on a team developing proprietary software for a startup on the hottest new language.

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Dusty Wanderer
captain of 1,000
Posts: 1458

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Dusty Wanderer »

Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 15th, 2023, 3:51 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 15th, 2023, 11:29 am
Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 14th, 2023, 10:39 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 14th, 2023, 7:56 pm Welcome to the forum, Dangerous Rhetoric.

I'm in the tech industry, as well. Even spent 5 years dedicated to information security, so I'm kind of geeking out about your cryptography experience. I'm also a Linux/UNIX aficionado from way back before your time, apparently, so your work on RTOS and RaspberryPI sounds interesting to me. Whatever you can do intellectually to keep those neurons firing is good for you.

Since you're willing to work warehouse jobs, etc, then you should be fine starting out in a technician or Helpdesk position with your experience and work up internally. That's the way I did it 20 or so years ago - started on a Helpdesk, then into systems and networking work, onto a development team, etc, to what I'm doing today. If you're patient and have a good attitude about learning everything you can wherever you're at, you'll excel.

And I second what creator says in regards to worthiness. I'd just add that intelligent minds don't do so well with downtime. Perhaps taking on a work or hobby/opensource project that challenges and stretches you intellectually will help fill in some of that vacuum, but not in a forced, moralizing crutch kind of way; just as something you'd prefer to be doing regardless.

Look forward to getting to know you around here.
I have an odd nostalgia for the tech industry before I was born because my math background draws me to want to derive solutions from the basics. Part of me wanted to develop for an old 16-bit IBM computer because it would be easier to flash and replace firmware and because primitive hardware would have more predictable and simpler behavior.

The Raspberry Pi, though, is close enough to ideal, and it's a scalable medium for a community project. Intel architecture is way too heavy for me to maintain a project for, and it took me finding 300 page manuals for each specific chipset on port-mapped i/o controls that got me to realize exactly what I got myself into.

I'll think about a help desk job. I've always assumed I was underqualified without a bachelor's for it and I haven't had much luck finding demand for that work before I stopped looking at it, but it's definitely up my alley.

Looking forward to seeing you around.
I love the RaspberryPi. I've got one running Slackware, as we speak. So, are you building an RTOS from scratch to run on RPi or are you contributing to FreeRTOS or some other project? Curious what you plan on using an RTOS for? :-)

Yes, a few minutes on LinkedIn.com, Indeed.com, or Dice.com searching for "help desk", "help desk tech", or "data center", "data center tech". Are you coding in C or C++? What platform were you primarily doing your cryptography on - linux? You might even be able to find a something with "junior c c++" or "junior embedded programmer", etc. Anyway, good luck.
I'm developing in Arch-based Linux using assembly and QEMU for OS development. I'm implementing the tool chain from scratch so I know exactly how it works. The programming language compiler I build within it is blueprinted as a typeless spin-off of Lisp because it's the simplest syntax to implement a compiler for optimized high-level code for. There would barely be a need for documentation to an end user on the syntax itself. My strategy to reduce security risks is to reduce the instruction set and to prevent surprises and complexity.

The use for it started with a personal goal, but it's actually a liberty-centered project. I don't know if I can get it off the ground, but the dream is to use it as an alternative to Unix with the same philosophy.

I think the client should be able to specify the third party that certifies the server. It's weird that we have an elaborate process where businesses collect consumer requests in a way that can easily be subpoenaed or intercepted by a corporate entity. You can just as easily stop a middleman with a protocol using any server outside your local area network. But most sites won't allow you to connect without certifying the connection, HSTS, so you're forced to give up data to these same few people.

Likewise, duckduckgo was caught red-handed in kahoots with Microsoft. Every major search engine is the gatekeeper to what we see, and it's probably better that the paradigm is not that you choose from six, but rather that there's a custom algorithm that you want it to use. The reason social media like Tiktok, Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook can just poof to the top of the appstore is because they're on Firefox's or Edge's front page or the feds paid to secure them priority.

I want to develop a platform for the parallel economy that's explicitly safe against censorship, guarantees true peer-to-peer privacy is available, and that whatever software installer or web API exists, and has more user supervision and transparency than an auto shop that just tells you how much it'll cost and to come back when it's done.

Some of these things can be solved with userspace software, but I always know that if the surface level audit shows this many problems, I should just start over so I can put a libertarian stamp on the low level details of the project.

The biggest things that I want to achieve with it is to develop projects alongside it like pointing people to an economy that's like Craigslist, farmer's markets, or Etsy, where you pay with cryptocurrency, and to develop a server certification system with a client-specified certificate authority rather than a server-specified authority, and to have features that are fundamentally incompatible with our tech infrastructure or provide a useful transition to a platform that doesn't send Microsoft cookies from every street corner you pass.

I see that conservatives and libertarians are boiling for options to hop off of big tech, so I see a market here. Maybe a job in tech support would help me understand how to explain these things to the average person and eventually lead to a startup.

As for other programming for more algorithmic or prototyping uses, I use the C family and Python for everything. I'm not really a full-stack oficionado. I've only used Flask for front-end web development, Pygame/Qt for game development, and requests or curl for scraping. Now I'm at the point where it seems like more mainstream tools are becoming obsolete for me to learn because I don't see myself ending up on a team developing proprietary software for a startup on the hottest new language.
Very interesting thoughts. I'm with you on utilizing technology to further liberty-centered agendas. Perhaps I should've responded over a private message, but maybe some of this will be of interest to others.

During the last presidential election cycle and "pandemic" I watched with everyone else as voices were silenced on various "platforms" simultaneously (really they're just glorified SaaS applications). I do use "platforms", though, in the sense that they are afforded certain financial and legal privileges from the government as such, but I digress.

What became more disturbing to me, though, was when large-scale IaaS/PaaS companies were shutting-down underlying infrastructure/servers of private website's without explanation in order to maintain the counter idea blackout. These entities deliberately stood up private web stacks in order not to violate the policies of these left-protecting "platforms" like Twitter, etc. There were some cases where multi-million dollar companies' SaaS and media servers were disappeared overnight on AWS.

Due to this I began looking for a way to host web server content ephemerally and distributed at large scales across any supported operating system connected to the internet. Think torrents and DDoS, but in the form of web servers. So for every AWS, GCP, Azure that shuts-down infrastructure hosting politically dissenting information/content, there would be hundreds+ of replica nodes still available. Further, it would also give the content owners some degree of anonymity, as it would be near impossible to determine the controlling node(s).

Anyway, I drew up some conceptual designs, was going to start an Open-source project for it, but the pressure abated, work got busy, etc. I still want to pursue it, though -- there will be future events, for sure. But some of your crypto, peer-to-peer and OS development seems aligned in the application of liberty-enabling tech. Who knows, maybe there's something there. (I want to learn C/C++ much better. I've always wanted to hack away on the Linux kernel. But day to day, I'm also in Linux, Python, Bash, and Golang here and there.)

All this brings me back to the additional systems and programming background you shared above. It really sheds more light on how familiar you actually are with the disciplines... probably more than you give yourself credit for. Perhaps do some searches on LinkedIn, Indeed, Dice, etc with keywords like "junior", "intern", "embedded", "linux", "c c++", "python", "flask", "systems", "developer", "engineer". Get in the door, develop your skills "professionally" and look for internal opportunities to shift and increase your abilities. (just my two cents)

Dangerous rhetoric
captain of 10
Posts: 27

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Dangerous rhetoric »

Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 15th, 2023, 5:34 pm
Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 15th, 2023, 3:51 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: March 15th, 2023, 11:29 am
Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 14th, 2023, 10:39 pm

I have an odd nostalgia for the tech industry before I was born because my math background draws me to want to derive solutions from the basics. Part of me wanted to develop for an old 16-bit IBM computer because it would be easier to flash and replace firmware and because primitive hardware would have more predictable and simpler behavior.

The Raspberry Pi, though, is close enough to ideal, and it's a scalable medium for a community project. Intel architecture is way too heavy for me to maintain a project for, and it took me finding 300 page manuals for each specific chipset on port-mapped i/o controls that got me to realize exactly what I got myself into.

I'll think about a help desk job. I've always assumed I was underqualified without a bachelor's for it and I haven't had much luck finding demand for that work before I stopped looking at it, but it's definitely up my alley.

Looking forward to seeing you around.
I love the RaspberryPi. I've got one running Slackware, as we speak. So, are you building an RTOS from scratch to run on RPi or are you contributing to FreeRTOS or some other project? Curious what you plan on using an RTOS for? :-)

Yes, a few minutes on LinkedIn.com, Indeed.com, or Dice.com searching for "help desk", "help desk tech", or "data center", "data center tech". Are you coding in C or C++? What platform were you primarily doing your cryptography on - linux? You might even be able to find a something with "junior c c++" or "junior embedded programmer", etc. Anyway, good luck.
I'm developing in Arch-based Linux using assembly and QEMU for OS development. I'm implementing the tool chain from scratch so I know exactly how it works. The programming language compiler I build within it is blueprinted as a typeless spin-off of Lisp because it's the simplest syntax to implement a compiler for optimized high-level code for. There would barely be a need for documentation to an end user on the syntax itself. My strategy to reduce security risks is to reduce the instruction set and to prevent surprises and complexity.

The use for it started with a personal goal, but it's actually a liberty-centered project. I don't know if I can get it off the ground, but the dream is to use it as an alternative to Unix with the same philosophy.

I think the client should be able to specify the third party that certifies the server. It's weird that we have an elaborate process where businesses collect consumer requests in a way that can easily be subpoenaed or intercepted by a corporate entity. You can just as easily stop a middleman with a protocol using any server outside your local area network. But most sites won't allow you to connect without certifying the connection, HSTS, so you're forced to give up data to these same few people.

Likewise, duckduckgo was caught red-handed in kahoots with Microsoft. Every major search engine is the gatekeeper to what we see, and it's probably better that the paradigm is not that you choose from six, but rather that there's a custom algorithm that you want it to use. The reason social media like Tiktok, Twitter, Reddit, and Facebook can just poof to the top of the appstore is because they're on Firefox's or Edge's front page or the feds paid to secure them priority.

I want to develop a platform for the parallel economy that's explicitly safe against censorship, guarantees true peer-to-peer privacy is available, and that whatever software installer or web API exists, and has more user supervision and transparency than an auto shop that just tells you how much it'll cost and to come back when it's done.

Some of these things can be solved with userspace software, but I always know that if the surface level audit shows this many problems, I should just start over so I can put a libertarian stamp on the low level details of the project.

The biggest things that I want to achieve with it is to develop projects alongside it like pointing people to an economy that's like Craigslist, farmer's markets, or Etsy, where you pay with cryptocurrency, and to develop a server certification system with a client-specified certificate authority rather than a server-specified authority, and to have features that are fundamentally incompatible with our tech infrastructure or provide a useful transition to a platform that doesn't send Microsoft cookies from every street corner you pass.

I see that conservatives and libertarians are boiling for options to hop off of big tech, so I see a market here. Maybe a job in tech support would help me understand how to explain these things to the average person and eventually lead to a startup.

As for other programming for more algorithmic or prototyping uses, I use the C family and Python for everything. I'm not really a full-stack oficionado. I've only used Flask for front-end web development, Pygame/Qt for game development, and requests or curl for scraping. Now I'm at the point where it seems like more mainstream tools are becoming obsolete for me to learn because I don't see myself ending up on a team developing proprietary software for a startup on the hottest new language.
Very interesting thoughts. I'm with you on utilizing technology to further liberty-centered agendas. Perhaps I should've responded over a private message, but maybe some of this will be of interest to others.

During the last presidential election cycle and "pandemic" I watched with everyone else as voices were silenced on various "platforms" simultaneously (really they're just glorified SaaS applications). I do use "platforms", though, in the sense that they are afforded certain financial and legal privileges from the government as such, but I digress.

What became more disturbing to me, though, was when large-scale IaaS/PaaS companies were shutting-down underlying infrastructure/servers of private website's without explanation in order to maintain the counter idea blackout. These entities deliberately stood up private web stacks in order not to violate the policies of these left-protecting "platforms" like Twitter, etc. There were some cases where multi-million dollar companies' SaaS and media servers were disappeared overnight on AWS.

Due to this I began looking for a way to host web server content ephemerally and distributed at large scales across any supported operating system connected to the internet. Think torrents and DDoS, but in the form of web servers. So for every AWS, GCP, Azure that shuts-down infrastructure hosting politically dissenting information/content, there would be hundreds+ of replica nodes still available. Further, it would also give the content owners some degree of anonymity, as it would be near impossible to determine the controlling node(s).

Anyway, I drew up some conceptual designs, was going to start an Open-source project for it, but the pressure abated, work got busy, etc. I still want to pursue it, though -- there will be future events, for sure. But some of your crypto, peer-to-peer and OS development seems aligned in the application of liberty-enabling tech. Who knows, maybe there's something there. (I want to learn C/C++ much better. I've always wanted to hack away on the Linux kernel. But day to day, I'm also in Linux, Python, Bash, and Golang here and there.)

All this brings me back to the additional systems and programming background you shared above. It really sheds more light on how familiar you actually are with the disciplines... probably more than you give yourself credit for. Perhaps do some searches on LinkedIn, Indeed, Dice, etc with keywords like "junior", "intern", "embedded", "linux", "c c++", "python", "flask", "systems", "developer", "engineer". Get in the door, develop your skills "professionally" and look for internal opportunities to shift and increase your abilities. (just my two cents)
For sure, I'm definitely planning to build a network to get this off the ground. It's a bit more in the drafting stage, but there are some questions I have for you that are probably of interest to the community because for sure this is something that's really important.

What's our threat model? We need to have a strategy to make it as expensive as possible to come after affiliates.

Physical harm/blackmail:

If the DOJ doesn't care about Donald Trump having to be evacuated from the white house or a Supreme Court Justice being visited by the mob, then we really need to build a network in areas with good policing practices and a responsible local militia that can deal with threats to kidnap someone's children. Otherwise people will pull out, and understandably so.

I watched Knowles the other day show a Tiktok of a Muslim lady who showed mild disapproval of a flamboyant activist influencer soliciting communication from minors and she later said pictures of her without a hijab were leaked, they had information on where her kids went to school and where she lived. It's not even that it's shocking on its own, but that she had no recourse but to apologize says something about what we're up against.

Personally, once this is up, the cost to ascertain and reach me physically will have multiple hurdles, and I'm not really afraid of being a martyr anyway. It would validate everything that led me to that moment.

One way to combat this that I've thought up is to make a blockchain DNS system and to anonymize servers to protect their location and identity. However, care needs to be taken that there's also (begrudgingly) KYC compliance and a system in place to keep it from harboring serious criminal uses or tax evasion.

Community:

If someone is going to lose their Mensa membership, their job, medical license, or in some way they are glued to a world full of CNN viewing zombies, then it's costly to jump into something like this.

It's therefore probably best to make it as clear as possible that this is for the punk kids and revolutionaries who aren't afraid to get ostracized to make a statement. It's not for the good boys and girls who do what they're told to.

Supply chains, investment, advertising:

ESG forces are going after supply chains, which means that a paper clip manufacturer that doesn't have a female CEO might cause another business to go without paper clips, since quarterly reports can't be done without paper clips for this one company that will lose George Soros's money if they keep doing quarterly reports with non-woke paper clips.

ESG also affects press coverage and can sort of act as a marker pheromones for the killer bees to know where to attack.

That's why the target market should probably not start with commercial vendors going for broad appeal and should rather be connecting individuals with their local community and with people who would otherwise buy woke cholesterol patties in the snack aisle, and it's important to assist loyal commerce partners with the necessary tools to meet their needs without ESG investments. They'd have to go after individual people whose bottom line isn't affected by democrat news outlets and who are expensive to target relative to the impact that canceling them into oblivion would have.

Maybe we also need some system like ESG for Christians to bolster and streamline boycotts, or to help investors recognize community efforts that are considered valuable or effective and to starve the commerce of secret combinations using the platform.

Cheating the system:

The biggest problem I'm seeing is that we can do everything right, and there's still a short circuit way for them to make illegal moves on the board. Silicon Valley Bank bailouts, and frankly the entire Biden presidency shows that they have the power to open up a portal using the Fed's magic wand and evoke a pile of money in the millions to give to people. Since this happens at the federal level, and they've figured out how to monetize killing babies, neutering children, and systematically breaking people to chronically medicate. The moral part of that is hard enough, but they care so much because it makes them stronger to fund Planned Parenthood with money taken from the working class.

Then they can basically plant feds at the white house in January 6th to stage a story that was milked past the midterms, and take extreme measures to guarantee the results they wanted.

That's where you just need to protect against any spell they can cast. Cryptocurrency dilutes against the fed and bad economic policies, since there are diminishing returns on the money printer for the uniparty against people not reliant on the USD, and... well, basically every function of the government that can have a privatized or charitable redundancy needs to have that.

Honestly, government tyranny you can't do much about without becoming a formidable voting block that creates powerful busybodies and representatives. That's a whole different subject, but if the tech exists to protect people who want to step into the combat zone, then that should start to happen.

I'm wondering if there are more things to add or there's a more active discussion about this. I want to do some case study analysis at how cancel culture works mechanistically. Who shows up where and says what to make what happen, or how exactly the poisoning process happens.

HVDC
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Posts: 2600

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by HVDC »

Dangerous rhetoric wrote: March 14th, 2023, 6:21 pm I am a young man who has been faithful and orthodox my whole life, but I have been unable to drag myself to church or participate in any community for my whole adult life. I regularly pray and do a meager to earnest amount of scripture study, depending on lunar phases and astrological indicators.

I went to college for a year hoping to get published as an expert in math and cryptography. I ended up dropping out after I kept flunking classes that were taught primarily by socialists, the DEI politics became an issue of dignity violation for me, it was very inefficient for learning compared to what I could manage on my own, and a conviction in the need for independence and self-sufficiency meant I was also working jobs alongside school to pay rent and I frankly recognized the opportunity cost that goes with investing into the system that I think may have been at times a false idol for me up to that point-- chasing accolades in academia.

I didn't take the stimulus checks owing to a young adult libertarian view of it being a violation of principle to accept it, even as I had a minimum wage job in food service until the plague. I worked in Portland that summer commuting as a pedestrian alone in low daylight or at night, during the BLM protests as a white guy without any of the status symbols of intersectional unionization like earring studs or Hasanabi glasses. And I came to recognize that success in academia requires abandoning your values at some point to rent status and position, so since then I've been working jobs that really aren't fulfilling, nor will lead to increased prospects. I worked in commercial fishing, but I feel worse every day I see gasping fish beheaded and their kidneys removed, but the nature of the industry mandates a boot camp style employment for a season requiring 16 hour days and 7 day weeks. They don't like requests for religious accommodations, and I don't like asking for them, owing to a more lasseiz-faire sympathy to agreements between people (to a point). I can't really do it any more, despite it being 11k per month without strings attached, without a barrier to entry.

I'm trying to figure out where to go now. I'm a bit washed up, because I don't have sources of motivation to put effort into improving my skills.

I can't recover from a chronic pornography problem I've had and felt guilty over since 13. I was pushed into baptizing my brother unworthily with no way out but to tell my mom for a second time about it, and by extension my extended family and church network. The problem got to Hannibal Lecter level pretty fast. I made every effort to stop it since the first time I consciously decided to seek it out. But I'll say it's at least an effective narcotic.

At the very least, it seems like something I do feel I know about my calling in life is that I want to start a homestead and protect liberty by giving people alternatives like locally grown, certified Lupron-free produce and products at market prices backing the crypto economy.

I'm working on a hobby project in RTOS development for the Raspberry Pi (no website or prototype available for it yet) that can implement protocols that replace the design for what I consider to be backdoors masquerading as security protocols and useful services, such as SSL/TLS and certificate authorization, 2FA, proprietary firmware and CPU design, VPN services, centralized DNS registries and servers, and Javascript as a whole. I understand the basics of circuit analysis and complex analysis, out of practice as I may be.

I've never thought lower than I do now of licensing, certification, schooling, or elitism, so I'm sort of stuck with warehouse labor until I can save enough to move and start conducting commerce. I don't know how I can prove to others or myself without betraying my petty ire for titles and certifications that I'm doing something well enough to be trusted to do things for them, and I recognize there's a legitimate necessity to make sure licensing exists to prevent harm so the reputation of the industry as a minefield for consumers or a harm to the environment is preserved, but I have had really bad experiences with recruiting/HR types who seem to like being a gatekeeper for things people want; after what is happening with Jordan Peterson, we need alternative authorities to the first option and probably a softening entirely in requirements for licensing where possible. Apprenticeships seem nice, but you have to go to school and take classes that will appropriate funds from these classes that will fund an institution that guilt-trips people that men make more playing soccer than women for colleges or insist that women face undue barriers, underrepresentation, and a lack of role models to inspire a career in construction management. One would like to believe this is fringe campaigning, but people around me at rates of at least 15% of people I went to high school with and still hear of, are the types to promote provocative, aggressive rhetoric where they're perpetually angry about what's trending, including the late-term abortion stuff, joking about assassinating or harassing people, January 6th reruns, and the "book banning" issue that even I thought was beyond what I'd ever see even being accustomed to the last iteration of the education system. A lot of teachers and people I held in high regard seem to be ideological telemarketers at night in a way that seems to transcend what I expected.

Hats off to licensed professionals and teachers doing good work out there, too. I'm here looking for a bit of a morale boost and to get advice from a community familiar with the nature of the LDS mindset and with the conspiratorial stuff that nobody near me is too concerned about.
Non-destructive Testing NDT.

https://www.otech.edu/non-destructive-i ... sting-ndi/

The industry is niche and begging for people.

Barrier to entry is low.

Vision requirements and some training.

So check it out.

Sir H

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Elizabeth
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Posts: 11796
Location: East Coast Australia

Greetings, community!

Post by Elizabeth »

🌻🙏🏻🌺
Welcome ..
:)

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Ymarsakar
captain of 1,000
Posts: 4470

Re: Greetings, community!

Post by Ymarsakar »

Welcome. You were not born for this world s current economic system. Just survive until the next economy comes ala brics.

In meanwhile i recommend using the energy of your libido for things like volunteer work, physical fitness, sun gazing, etc.

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