Adding to our supplies

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BeNotDeceived
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by BeNotDeceived »

Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 21st, 2022, 9:57 pm
Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 12:01 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 21st, 2022, 10:38 am
Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 5:21 am Just adding another thank you for the linen shirt suggestion. I have also bought several pairs of linen pants. My husband prefers these when working in the yard.
What are the benefits of linen, other than its breathability?
Linen is breathable and moisture-wicking. Try working in the hot humid East Texas sun in a pair of cotton jeans for a few hours. They will be soaked in sweat. (forgive me, but my son calls this swamp butt). Try the same thing in Linen. I promise that you will be much more comfortable. The linen does not trap in your body heat.

I found the following on a linen sight and I have not verified their claims:
Linen breathes naturally and offers the best comfort in high heat.

Research has demonstrated that a person who wears linen sweats 1.5 times less than when wearing cotton and 2 times less than when wearing a synthetic such as rayon. Imagine how comfortable that would be for your body!

It is also extremely absorbent – it can absorb up to 20% of its weight in sweat before it even feels wet! (hello, sweaty bus rides in humid weather). It is also 3x stronger than cotton!

Linen, because of its natural fibers and production process, is inherently hypo-allergenic. Wearing linen will help you avoid common allergic reactions found with other fabrics, particularly synthetics. It is also antibacterial and is the only natural fibre that is accepted internally in the human body which is why linen has been used as bandages dating way back to the Egyptians.

Linen is naturally thermo-regulating. It’s insulating in the cold, and cool and breathable when it’s warm. Linen offers strong protection against solar radiation.

Exceptionally Long-Lasting: Linen is one of the few fabrics that actually get better with age. It becomes softer, smoother, and more lustrous. Lasting to 12 times as long as cotton, linen regularly passes from generation to generation
Thanks, Momma J.

I'm a bit of an outdoorsman, so from your post I was wondering if linen could serve as a natural fiber base layer, as opposed to synthetic (since wool base layers are so expensive). It appears that you could use linen as a base layer. I'll have to give it a shot.
Ditch the long underwear and get flannel lined jeans.

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Dusty Wanderer
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Dusty Wanderer »

BeNotDeceived wrote: September 21st, 2022, 10:19 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 21st, 2022, 9:57 pm
Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 12:01 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 21st, 2022, 10:38 am

What are the benefits of linen, other than its breathability?
Linen is breathable and moisture-wicking. Try working in the hot humid East Texas sun in a pair of cotton jeans for a few hours. They will be soaked in sweat. (forgive me, but my son calls this swamp butt). Try the same thing in Linen. I promise that you will be much more comfortable. The linen does not trap in your body heat.

I found the following on a linen sight and I have not verified their claims:
Linen breathes naturally and offers the best comfort in high heat.

Research has demonstrated that a person who wears linen sweats 1.5 times less than when wearing cotton and 2 times less than when wearing a synthetic such as rayon. Imagine how comfortable that would be for your body!

It is also extremely absorbent – it can absorb up to 20% of its weight in sweat before it even feels wet! (hello, sweaty bus rides in humid weather). It is also 3x stronger than cotton!

Linen, because of its natural fibers and production process, is inherently hypo-allergenic. Wearing linen will help you avoid common allergic reactions found with other fabrics, particularly synthetics. It is also antibacterial and is the only natural fibre that is accepted internally in the human body which is why linen has been used as bandages dating way back to the Egyptians.

Linen is naturally thermo-regulating. It’s insulating in the cold, and cool and breathable when it’s warm. Linen offers strong protection against solar radiation.

Exceptionally Long-Lasting: Linen is one of the few fabrics that actually get better with age. It becomes softer, smoother, and more lustrous. Lasting to 12 times as long as cotton, linen regularly passes from generation to generation
Thanks, Momma J.

I'm a bit of an outdoorsman, so from your post I was wondering if linen could serve as a natural fiber base layer, as opposed to synthetic (since wool base layers are so expensive). It appears that you could use linen as a base layer. I'll have to give it a shot.
Ditch the long underwear and get flannel lined jeans.
As long as that flannel is made from wool and/or synthetics, rather than cotton, then that could be an option, too.

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BeNotDeceived
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by BeNotDeceived »

Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 22nd, 2022, 9:58 am
BeNotDeceived wrote: September 21st, 2022, 10:19 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 21st, 2022, 9:57 pm
Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 12:01 pm
Linen is breathable and moisture-wicking. Try working in the hot humid East Texas sun in a pair of cotton jeans for a few hours. They will be soaked in sweat. (forgive me, but my son calls this swamp butt). Try the same thing in Linen. I promise that you will be much more comfortable. The linen does not trap in your body heat.

I found the following on a linen sight and I have not verified their claims:
Thanks, Momma J.

I'm a bit of an outdoorsman, so from your post I was wondering if linen could serve as a natural fiber base layer, as opposed to synthetic (since wool base layers are so expensive). It appears that you could use linen as a base layer. I'll have to give it a shot.
Ditch the long underwear and get flannel lined jeans.
As long as that flannel is made from wool and/or synthetics, rather than cotton, then that could be an option, too.
I wore Wrangler brand from Walmart. Good for short exposures to 20 below. Any long exposures us Xtreme Arctic Carhart coveralls with BalaClava and Muckluck boots or equivalent rated to 60 below. And don’t forget ski goggles unless you want to look like Rocky Racoon. :lol:

OCDMOM
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by OCDMOM »

Bird flu wiping out egg and Turkey supplies across America.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/resurgen ... 09558.html.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

OCDMOM wrote: September 23rd, 2022, 10:18 am Bird flu wiping out egg and Turkey supplies across America.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/resurgen ... 09558.html.
Manufactured????

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

BeNotDeceived wrote: September 23rd, 2022, 2:58 am

I wore Wrangler brand from Walmart. Good for short exposures to 20 below. Any long exposures us Xtreme Arctic Carhart coveralls with BalaClava and Muckluck boots or equivalent rated to 60 below. And don’t forget ski goggles unless you want to look like Rocky Racoon. :lol:
We each have an old pair of 3M Thinsulate long underwear. They are thin like an old favorite t-shirt, but very warm. Many years ago my oldest son and husband both worked in a freezer warehouse. They were each given a pair of the Thinsulate to wear under their freezer suits. I have not been able to find them again, but think I might try Weerti brand

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Any here with experience raising goats? I hear that they are a pain in the backside, but I feel that they are my best option for keeping poison ivy at bay. Also the milk is good for those who are lactose intolerant. My grandfather raised goats on his farm. But I remember very little of the upkeep.

Strong pen... They love to climb and get into trouble. He had collars on them and would hook them to a long line to clear his fence lines of weeds.

Besides going out with him at milking time, I remember very little. There are tons of books that I can read... but wondering about first hand experience.

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Cruiserdude
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Cruiserdude »

Momma J wrote: September 27th, 2022, 5:22 am Any here with experience raising goats? I hear that they are a pain in the backside, but I feel that they are my best option for keeping poison ivy at bay. Also the milk is good for those who are lactose intolerant. My grandfather raised goats on his farm. But I remember very little of the upkeep.

Strong pen... They love to climb and get into trouble. He had collars on them and would hook them to a long line to clear his fence lines of weeds.

Besides going out with him at milking time, I remember very little. There are tons of books that I can read... but wondering about first hand experience.
We had one for a little while growing up on 2.5 acres. Same thing, my pops wanted it for keeping the vegetation at bay. This was western Washington, lots of trees and vegetation, so between trees we ran strong line and then attached to goat's leash and collar.

OCDMOM
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by OCDMOM »

Momma J wrote: September 27th, 2022, 5:12 am
OCDMOM wrote: September 23rd, 2022, 10:18 am Bird flu wiping out egg and Turkey supplies across America.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/resurgen ... 09558.html.
Manufactured????
Who knows.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Heading deeper into our wooded lot we have found three very large fat wood stumps. We are harvesting more fire starter sticks than we will need. I am thinking about selling some at the local farmers market. I had fun testing out a couple with my magnesium sticks.

I have also found a grove of sweet gum trees. A few are very large... I will be studying their use in depth, but found a very short info page that is encouraging: https://eatwild.weebly.com/blog/sweet-gum

That along with wild plum and Hickory trees and dewberry and mustang grape vines. Oh the joys of discovery on our little slice of heaven. :)

We are also cursed with poison ivy and greenbrier. :roll:

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

I was able to get my greenhouse framing completed this weekend! Hopefully I will be able to install the panels soon.

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HVDC
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by HVDC »

Momma J wrote: October 4th, 2022, 7:22 am Heading deeper into our wooded lot we have found three very large fat wood stumps. We are harvesting more fire starter sticks than we will need. I am thinking about selling some at the local farmers market. I had fun testing out a couple with my magnesium sticks.

I have also found a grove of sweet gum trees. A few are very large... I will be studying their use in depth, but found a very short info page that is encouraging: https://eatwild.weebly.com/blog/sweet-gum

That along with wild plum and Hickory trees and dewberry and mustang grape vines. Oh the joys of discovery on our little slice of heaven. :)

We are also cursed with poison ivy and greenbrier. :roll:
At least the Greenbrier is edible.

Maybe goats or sheep will eat it.

Sir FABBO!

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Dusty Wanderer
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Dusty Wanderer »

Momma J wrote: September 27th, 2022, 5:17 am
BeNotDeceived wrote: September 23rd, 2022, 2:58 am

I wore Wrangler brand from Walmart. Good for short exposures to 20 below. Any long exposures us Xtreme Arctic Carhart coveralls with BalaClava and Muckluck boots or equivalent rated to 60 below. And don’t forget ski goggles unless you want to look like Rocky Racoon. :lol:
We each have an old pair of 3M Thinsulate long underwear. They are thin like an old favorite t-shirt, but very warm. Many years ago my oldest son and husband both worked in a freezer warehouse. They were each given a pair of the Thinsulate to wear under their freezer suits. I have not been able to find them again, but think I might try Weerti brand
That Weerti brand looks like they would work. If you can find an off-brand polypropylene thermal, it's very efficient at retaining heat and wicking moisture, too. It's also a plastic-type synthetic fabric like polyester.

Just a word of caution with synthetic fabrics, though, is that if you plan on being around exposed flame or intense heat, like you could do with wool, they are flammable and once ignited will melt to your skin, causing severe burns. Not to pull you away from your decision, I use them myself a lot, but not if I plan on camping next to an open fire.

OCDMOM
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by OCDMOM »

Momma J wrote: September 27th, 2022, 5:22 am Any here with experience raising goats? I hear that they are a pain in the backside, but I feel that they are my best option for keeping poison ivy at bay. Also the milk is good for those who are lactose intolerant. My grandfather raised goats on his farm. But I remember very little of the upkeep.

Strong pen... They love to climb and get into trouble. He had collars on them and would hook them to a long line to clear his fence lines of weeds.

Besides going out with him at milking time, I remember very little. There are tons of books that I can read... but wondering about first hand experience.
My husband's buddy gave us 2 goats a long time ago. A male and a female. They loved to eat the vines my neighbors grew on the fence. They wouldn't eat anything else. The male goat smelled very bad. He would climb on fences and get up on top of our house. People driving by probably were, look a goat on that roof. I made my husband give those goats back to his buddy.

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harakim
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by harakim »

Momma J wrote: September 27th, 2022, 5:22 am Any here with experience raising goats? I hear that they are a pain in the backside, but I feel that they are my best option for keeping poison ivy at bay. Also the milk is good for those who are lactose intolerant. My grandfather raised goats on his farm. But I remember very little of the upkeep.

Strong pen... They love to climb and get into trouble. He had collars on them and would hook them to a long line to clear his fence lines of weeds.

Besides going out with him at milking time, I remember very little. There are tons of books that I can read... but wondering about first hand experience.
I don't know if sheep eat poison ivy, but they are extremely easy to raise.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

A funny moment:
I had no idea that my physical strength had been somewhat zapped until I tried to climb up on a platform with a section of fascia board to repair squirrel damage. I adapt quickly and became adequate at holding the board in place with my head while shooting in nails with the nail gun.

When pulling down old fascia board I should have been prepared to have 50-plus years of squirrel pooh fall on my head.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

A bit of trivia... I cannot eat soy. My body began attacking with histamines shortly after we began using GMOs. So, I am constantly reading package labels. Soy, in its many forms, is incorporated into many foods that we consume.

I just stumbled on this gem...
U. S.-based, unfermented, and overly processed soy will have a direct impact on your levels of testosterone and DHT, effectively lowering both. This is especially true for those guys who are looking to build muscle. Stay far away from soy-based protein.

FoundMyEden
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by FoundMyEden »

Momma J wrote: September 27th, 2022, 5:22 am Any here with experience raising goats? I hear that they are a pain in the backside, but I feel that they are my best option for keeping poison ivy at bay. Also the milk is good for those who are lactose intolerant. My grandfather raised goats on his farm. But I remember very little of the upkeep.

Strong pen... They love to climb and get into trouble. He had collars on them and would hook them to a long line to clear his fence lines of weeds.

Besides going out with him at milking time, I remember very little. There are tons of books that I can read... but wondering about first hand experience.
Yes. I raise them. Some can be a pain, depending on what you are wanting to do with them. But they are far easier for me than the sheep that I have. I cull or sell the jumpers and breed for dependability and gentleness. But I also do not like animals that can't survive without being babied. My biggest issue is the noise. IF you have something for them to keep their mouth busy chewing then they don't get really noisy. My pens are hog tight and horse high. They love to rub against the fencing if it's not hot...mine is not hot, so it's good and tight to keep them in. But they need a post or something to rub against...they love to rub.

I have had them out to free graze my fields...taught them to come when I called while shaking some grain and they come right in. I have also used a dog collar and tied to some fencing or staked them out to eat whatever I wanted them to.

My girls give our family a couple gallons a day and the milk is great as long as I keep them away from the buck pen, or it can have a different taste...more "goaty". Fresh goat milk is the best but just like fresh cow milk, if you're not used to the raw taste and you have adapted to store bought stuff then you might not like it right away. You can try goat milk from the store, but I advise against it if you ever want to try it again...lol

My bucks can get musky during fall. They like to pee on themselves, it's gross but I just steer clear of them for the season.
Maintenance is pretty easy for my breed. They get copper, wormer, and trimming once a year. Grass or hay or weeds for feed. The girls I keep on good hay and grain during milking to keep the milk sweet. I would rather milk a goat than a cow...unless it was a small cow, my grandparents had jerseys, so we were spoiled with their milk.

Anyway, I hope that helps.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

FoundMyEden wrote: October 17th, 2022, 1:33 pm
Momma J wrote: September 27th, 2022, 5:22 am Any here with experience raising goats? I hear that they are a pain in the backside, but I feel that they are my best option for keeping poison ivy at bay. Also the milk is good for those who are lactose intolerant. My grandfather raised goats on his farm. But I remember very little of the upkeep.

Strong pen... They love to climb and get into trouble. He had collars on them and would hook them to a long line to clear his fence lines of weeds.

Besides going out with him at milking time, I remember very little. There are tons of books that I can read... but wondering about first hand experience.
Yes. I raise them. Some can be a pain, depending on what you are wanting to do with them. But they are far easier for me than the sheep that I have. I cull or sell the jumpers and breed for dependability and gentleness. But I also do not like animals that can't survive without being babied. My biggest issue is the noise. IF you have something for them to keep their mouth busy chewing then they don't get really noisy. My pens are hog tight and horse high. They love to rub against the fencing if it's not hot...mine is not hot, so it's good and tight to keep them in. But they need a post or something to rub against...they love to rub.

I have had them out to free graze my fields...taught them to come when I called while shaking some grain and they come right in. I have also used a dog collar and tied to some fencing or staked them out to eat whatever I wanted them to.

My girls give our family a couple gallons a day and the milk is great as long as I keep them away from the buck pen, or it can have a different taste...more "goaty". Fresh goat milk is the best but just like fresh cow milk, if you're not used to the raw taste and you have adapted to store bought stuff then you might not like it right away. You can try goat milk from the store, but I advise against it if you ever want to try it again...lol

My bucks can get musky during fall. They like to pee on themselves, it's gross but I just steer clear of them for the season.
Maintenance is pretty easy for my breed. They get copper, wormer, and trimming once a year. Grass or hay or weeds for feed. The girls I keep on good hay and grain during milking to keep the milk sweet. I would rather milk a goat than a cow...unless it was a small cow, my grandparents had jerseys, so we were spoiled with their milk.

Anyway, I hope that helps.
Fantastic information! I am sure that I will have more questions for you in the near future.

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Thinker
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Re: Adding to our supplies

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FoundMyEden wrote: October 17th, 2022, 1:33 pm... My biggest issue is the noise. IF you have something for them to keep their mouth busy chewing then they don't get really noisy…
:)
Spoiler
I grew up helping tend goats. But we lived in a neighborhood surrounded by mansions with swimming pools - definitely the odd one on the block. So most people wouldn’t expect a little farm hidden behind the trees & behind our house. One day, a man was jogging by & came knocking frantically at our door, “Is everyone alright?! I heard the cry for help!” It was our goats “Heeeeelp!” :lol:

FoundMyEden
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by FoundMyEden »

Thinker wrote: October 18th, 2022, 9:35 am
FoundMyEden wrote: October 17th, 2022, 1:33 pm... My biggest issue is the noise. IF you have something for them to keep their mouth busy chewing then they don't get really noisy…
:)
Spoiler
I grew up helping tend goats. But we lived in a neighborhood surrounded by mansions with swimming pools - definitely the odd one on the block. So most people wouldn’t expect a little farm hidden behind the trees & behind our house. One day, a man was jogging by & came knocking frantically at our door, “Is everyone alright?! I heard the cry for help!” It was our goats “Heeeeelp!” :lol:
That’s funny. I’ve actually mistaken my goats for my kids hollering.

That little farm sounds picturesque. Neat!

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Thinker
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Thinker »

FoundMyEden wrote: October 18th, 2022, 8:31 pmThat’s funny. I’ve actually mistaken my goats for my kids hollering.

That little farm sounds picturesque. Neat!
:lol: I can imagine - they really can sound like people!

It will always feel like home - I loved having space to play, build tree forts etc.

If I recall you’re in beautiful country!

FoundMyEden
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by FoundMyEden »

Thinker wrote: October 19th, 2022, 10:07 am
FoundMyEden wrote: October 18th, 2022, 8:31 pmThat’s funny. I’ve actually mistaken my goats for my kids hollering.

That little farm sounds picturesque. Neat!


If I recall you’re in beautiful country!
Yes Ma’am. High in the mountain tops but still in the desert valley. Beauty is in the perception of the beholder. Some rather enjoy the sea more, which I do miss. I used to live a few hours from the ocean. Now, high mountains AND precipitation…that’s my true Eden.

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Thinker
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Re: Adding to our supplies

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FoundMyEden wrote: October 19th, 2022, 1:26 pmYes Ma’am. High in the mountain tops but still in the desert valley. Beauty is in the perception of the beholder. Some rather enjoy the sea more, which I do miss. I used to live a few hours from the ocean. Now, high mountains AND precipitation…that’s my true Eden.
I’m happy for you. How awesome to live in a place that looks & feels like Eden! 👍🏼😊

When I was in college, I went with my roommate to her hometown in Helena - beautiful rolling hills.

Sometimes I also miss the beach, but the mountains are like temples.

OCDMOM
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by OCDMOM »

Tomatoes, uncooked beef roasts and steaks, reported to have a lower price right now.

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