Adding to our supplies

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Thanks for all of the great suggestions. We are really pleased with the linen shirts (game changer). I bought them a bit larger than normal to allow more air to flow around us. That along with wide brimmed, vented hats with neck flaps are allowing us to be out in the heat for longer periods... perhaps we are also acclimating.

Any ideas for good pants? Jeans are too hot and fleas are a real issue in East Texas this year. I am contemplating going to a military surplus store and looking at what they might have. Tactical or khaki ... We need them to be durable yet very breathable. We are still doing a great deal of work clearing heavy brush and saplings.

Tomatoes, peppers, and cukes are all supplying us with surplus which we are trading for fresh eggs and honey. Once I am out there full time we will have our own chickens and goats.
Last edited by Momma J on June 14th, 2022, 8:12 am, edited 1 time in total.

Niyr
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Niyr »

As a fellow E Texan, I share your pain. Plus, I hate the humidity here. Diatomaceous earth is a natural remedy that can help with fleas. Make sure you wear a mask when wearing it, the dust is bad for your lungs, as it is crushed up ancient sea shells. Vinegar will kill ants, nearly instantly. Might be able to do a vinegar-water solution and soak the ant hills.

You can get some cheap hiking/outdoor style pants at Wal-Mart or Academy or Kohls.

JohnnyL
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JohnnyL »

Momma J wrote: May 31st, 2022, 5:51 am My husband's grandmother told me that they added cooked rice to scrambled eggs to stretch them further. I gave it a try several years back and we love them. We now always add leftover rice to our scrambled eggs, even better if you sprinkle in a handful of shredded cheese.
You can boil leftover / cooked rice in water to make a "soup". Chinese eat it all the time. You can add pretty much any vegetable/ meat to it.

JohnnyL
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JohnnyL »

Sunain wrote: June 7th, 2022, 2:21 pm
Gadianton Slayer wrote: May 23rd, 2022, 2:11 pm
Momma J wrote: May 23rd, 2022, 2:02 pm Fire ant control - I am open to suggestions.
Gasoline :)
Gasoline only lasts so long, shelf life can be like 1-2 years max. Modern LiFePO4 (or better) batteries, can easily last 10 years+. Been slowly converting my stuff away from gas powered to electric powered.
There are gasoline life-extenders that work wonders. Amazon sells them.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

I could write a book about why I love our little corner of Heaven.... (side note ~ Not our house in the distance. I took this pic while we were doing a little recon in the area. I love that our neighbors are like minded and we are working together)
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blitzinstripes
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by blitzinstripes »

A topic that came up in discussion among friends this week, concerning pending food shortages was "rabbit starvation" in which the limited available food in times of need may not have sufficient fat content to replace the fat reserves that are being lost on the survival diet.

There are several options for obtaining sufficient fat, but one of the best is traditional rendered lard.

Lard got a bad rap in the early twentieth century, but more recent studies have shown it to be a healthier source of fat than many of the highly processed plant oils. Lard is usually inexpensive, available from most local butchers, and can be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. It's perfect for all kinds of frying and many other cooking and baking purposes. You can often purchase it in 3-5 gallon buckets. I plan on getting a couple of buckets myself, in the near future.

In a pinch, you can fry nearly anything including herbs and vegetables in the lard and get that required fat that may be so desperately needed.

It was also a valuable trade commodity in ancient and colonial times.

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Pazooka
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Location: FEMA District 8

Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Pazooka »

blitzinstripes wrote: June 15th, 2022, 10:16 am A topic that came up in discussion among friends this week, concerning pending food shortages was "rabbit starvation" in which the limited available food in times of need may not have sufficient fat content to replace the fat reserves that are being lost on the survival diet.

There are several options for obtaining sufficient fat, but one of the best is traditional rendered lard.

Lard got a bad rap in the early twentieth century, but more recent studies have shown it to be a healthier source of fat than many of the highly processed plant oils. Lard is usually inexpensive, available from most local butchers, and can be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. It's perfect for all kinds of frying and many other cooking and baking purposes. You can often purchase it in 3-5 gallon buckets. I plan on getting a couple of buckets myself, in the near future.

In a pinch, you can fry nearly anything including herbs and vegetables in the lard and get that required fat that may be so desperately needed.

It was also a valuable trade commodity in ancient and colonial times.
Yes!!! I’ve been rendering lard for 10 years. True poverty, thy used to say, is seeing the bottom of the lard barrell.

A few tips I learned is to ask for the “leaf fat” that surrounds the organs. Using a meat grinder makes things go so much quicker in the rendering process. And then canning it in jars using a water bath will keep it fresh for a long time.

This is one of the dietary changes we made to help my daughter and husband get over their mood disorders several years ago. Their brains were just crying out for some lard...and raw milk...and butter, etc.

JohnnyL
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JohnnyL »

blitzinstripes wrote: June 15th, 2022, 10:16 am A topic that came up in discussion among friends this week, concerning pending food shortages was "rabbit starvation" in which the limited available food in times of need may not have sufficient fat content to replace the fat reserves that are being lost on the survival diet.

There are several options for obtaining sufficient fat, but one of the best is traditional rendered lard.

Lard got a bad rap in the early twentieth century, but more recent studies have shown it to be a healthier source of fat than many of the highly processed plant oils. Lard is usually inexpensive, available from most local butchers, and can be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. It's perfect for all kinds of frying and many other cooking and baking purposes. You can often purchase it in 3-5 gallon buckets. I plan on getting a couple of buckets myself, in the near future.

In a pinch, you can fry nearly anything including herbs and vegetables in the lard and get that required fat that may be so desperately needed.

It was also a valuable trade commodity in ancient and colonial times.
Saw some in Walmart, pretty expensive stuff there.

Didn't think about big bucket containers at other places.

JuneBug12000
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JuneBug12000 »

blitzinstripes wrote: June 11th, 2022, 3:55 pm Here is a great and inexpensive product that I recommend for everyone.

https://hotwhitepot.com/store/lehman-s- ... rm=1004742
Beware of scams.

That is about $1100 less than the original.

https://www.lehmans.com/product/lehmans ... h-wringer/

JohnnyL
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JohnnyL »

JuneBug12000 wrote: June 15th, 2022, 10:47 pm
blitzinstripes wrote: June 11th, 2022, 3:55 pm Here is a great and inexpensive product that I recommend for everyone.

https://hotwhitepot.com/store/lehman-s- ... rm=1004742
Beware of scams.

That is about $1100 less than the original.

https://www.lehmans.com/product/lehmans ... h-wringer/
I thought that was a mistype, then checked it--ha ha, now I'm not sure WHICH one is the scam!

JuneBug12000
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JuneBug12000 »

JohnnyL wrote: June 16th, 2022, 8:14 am
JuneBug12000 wrote: June 15th, 2022, 10:47 pm
blitzinstripes wrote: June 11th, 2022, 3:55 pm Here is a great and inexpensive product that I recommend for everyone.

https://hotwhitepot.com/store/lehman-s- ... rm=1004742
Beware of scams.

That is about $1100 less than the original.

https://www.lehmans.com/product/lehmans ... h-wringer/
I thought that was a mistype, then checked it--ha ha, now I'm not sure WHICH one is the scam!
The Lehman's link is the original.

But I can tell you from experience, it is not necessary. A couple of 5 gal buckets and your hands are all you need.

If you want to get fancy you can add a NEW black ridged plunger, but I only use that for socks and underwear to minimize contact.

I never used a wringer, again to expensive, but I recently bought a commercial mop bucket with wringer to save my hands and I got a new outdoor line dryer for my clothes as well. (Lift-o-matic)

In all I have gotten by with 2-5 gal buckets, so I can wash a load and soak the next at the same time. Just rinse in the same bucket you washed in.

Fancier: plunger to keep hands clean from socks and underwear.
Even fancier: a mop bucket to help wring out clothes.

I have dried clothes inside my house by stringing up a line, even jeans dry pretty fast. And I have an outside laundry line. the one I have is nice because there is only the 6 inch permanent piece in the ground and I can fold up and bring the line inside if needed. We have very strong winds here.

No one needs to spend $1100 for a hand washing machine, but you can't get the Lehman one for $60 either. That is a scam.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rubbermaid- ... /204643189

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Brabantia-1 ... /306618976

JuneBug12000
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Posts: 1103

Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by JuneBug12000 »

Just a chicken video:
Hatching eggs with broody hens

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPCCGG1WvSY&t=930s

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mudflap
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by mudflap »

blitzinstripes wrote: June 15th, 2022, 10:16 am A topic that came up in discussion among friends this week, concerning pending food shortages was "rabbit starvation" in which the limited available food in times of need may not have sufficient fat content to replace the fat reserves that are being lost on the survival diet.

There are several options for obtaining sufficient fat, but one of the best is traditional rendered lard.

Lard got a bad rap in the early twentieth century, but more recent studies have shown it to be a healthier source of fat than many of the highly processed plant oils. Lard is usually inexpensive, available from most local butchers, and can be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. It's perfect for all kinds of frying and many other cooking and baking purposes. You can often purchase it in 3-5 gallon buckets. I plan on getting a couple of buckets myself, in the near future.

In a pinch, you can fry nearly anything including herbs and vegetables in the lard and get that required fat that may be so desperately needed.

It was also a valuable trade commodity in ancient and colonial times.
Yes, Bradford Angier talks about this in his book "How to Survive in the Woods" - his theoretical setting is lost in the Canadian wilderness at a remote cabin with a stream nearby with all the salmon you can eat - should you fish for salmon, or go out and hunt for a moose? He says go for the moose because the Salmon doesn't have enough fat to keep you alive all winter.

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mudflap
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by mudflap »

someone was asking about chicken coops on another forum, so I wrote up a quick guide on building one. you should be able to build a coop for free - here's how:

https://mudbox.freedombox.rocks/ikiwiki ... ken_Coops/

blitzinstripes
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Posts: 1020

Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by blitzinstripes »

mudflap wrote: June 27th, 2022, 12:01 pm
blitzinstripes wrote: June 15th, 2022, 10:16 am A topic that came up in discussion among friends this week, concerning pending food shortages was "rabbit starvation" in which the limited available food in times of need may not have sufficient fat content to replace the fat reserves that are being lost on the survival diet.

There are several options for obtaining sufficient fat, but one of the best is traditional rendered lard.

Lard got a bad rap in the early twentieth century, but more recent studies have shown it to be a healthier source of fat than many of the highly processed plant oils. Lard is usually inexpensive, available from most local butchers, and can be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. It's perfect for all kinds of frying and many other cooking and baking purposes. You can often purchase it in 3-5 gallon buckets. I plan on getting a couple of buckets myself, in the near future.

In a pinch, you can fry nearly anything including herbs and vegetables in the lard and get that required fat that may be so desperately needed.

It was also a valuable trade commodity in ancient and colonial times.
Yes, Bradford Angier talks about this in his book "How to Survive in the Woods" - his theoretical setting is lost in the Canadian wilderness at a remote cabin with a stream nearby with all the salmon you can eat - should you fish for salmon, or go out and hunt for a moose? He says go for the moose because the Salmon doesn't have enough fat to keep you alive all winter.
As long as you are able to store all the fat from the moose. On a recent season of "Alone", one guy managed to take down a moose with a bow, but a wolverine raided his fat stash. All he was left with was the lean meat which lacked enough fat to sustain him. In the end he fared worse than the guys catching fish. He was literally wasting away with a belly full of lean meat.

Since I harvest a lot of venison, it's something I'm pretty cognizant of. Most cuts are over 90% lean. I don't usually save my venison fat, but if food became scarce, I would have to.

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Added another quart of unfiltered raw honey. The flavor has an amazing citrus flavor.

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mudflap
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by mudflap »

I stumbled onto this last night:

https://www.community-exchange.org/home/

I'd like to set one up for my local area, but like everything else, I don't think there'll be any takers.

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harakim
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Location: Salt Lake Megalopolis

Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by harakim »

JuneBug12000 wrote: June 16th, 2022, 4:22 pm
JohnnyL wrote: June 16th, 2022, 8:14 am
JuneBug12000 wrote: June 15th, 2022, 10:47 pm
blitzinstripes wrote: June 11th, 2022, 3:55 pm Here is a great and inexpensive product that I recommend for everyone.

https://hotwhitepot.com/store/lehman-s- ... rm=1004742
Beware of scams.

That is about $1100 less than the original.

https://www.lehmans.com/product/lehmans ... h-wringer/
I thought that was a mistype, then checked it--ha ha, now I'm not sure WHICH one is the scam!
The Lehman's link is the original.

But I can tell you from experience, it is not necessary. A couple of 5 gal buckets and your hands are all you need.

If you want to get fancy you can add a NEW black ridged plunger, but I only use that for socks and underwear to minimize contact.

I never used a wringer, again to expensive, but I recently bought a commercial mop bucket with wringer to save my hands and I got a new outdoor line dryer for my clothes as well. (Lift-o-matic)

In all I have gotten by with 2-5 gal buckets, so I can wash a load and soak the next at the same time. Just rinse in the same bucket you washed in.

Fancier: plunger to keep hands clean from socks and underwear.
Even fancier: a mop bucket to help wring out clothes.

I have dried clothes inside my house by stringing up a line, even jeans dry pretty fast. And I have an outside laundry line. the one I have is nice because there is only the 6 inch permanent piece in the ground and I can fold up and bring the line inside if needed. We have very strong winds here.

No one needs to spend $1100 for a hand washing machine, but you can't get the Lehman one for $60 either. That is a scam.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rubbermaid- ... /204643189

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Brabantia-1 ... /306618976
I wouldn't discount the wringer so quickly. Do you live in a dry climate? In a humid, low-altitude climate, you have to wring the clothes really well to have a chance of them drying and if they don't dry, they'll mildew in a day.

Mala_Suerte
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Posts: 144
Location: Western Slope

Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Mala_Suerte »

Sunain wrote: June 7th, 2022, 2:21 pm
Gadianton Slayer wrote: May 23rd, 2022, 2:11 pm
Momma J wrote: May 23rd, 2022, 2:02 pm Fire ant control - I am open to suggestions.
Gasoline :)
Gasoline only lasts so long, shelf life can be like 1-2 years max. Modern LiFePO4 (or better) batteries, can easily last 10 years+. Been slowly converting my stuff away from gas powered to electric powered.
What makes gasoline not last are two things. One air, and two the ethanol they put in it. If you have well-sealed containers - think older red or green jerry cans w/ a rubber seal. I try to only store non-ethanol gas. It's not always easy to find, but it doesn't eat rubber seals in small engines as ethanol gas will. You can also add fuel treatment which will extend the life of gas.

RE: long sleeve shirts for summer - I buy long sleeve fishing shirts from Cabelas, Sportsman's Wharehouse or wherever. They are made to allow the air to flow through, but also keep the sun off. They can be expensive unless you start looking for the late summer/early fall clearance sales. I wear these types of shirts when I ride my motorcycle in hot weather (under a mesh armored jacket) b/c the constant airflow across skin will pull moisture out and dehydrate you.

RE: summer pants - I have a pair of hiking pants that let you zip off the lower leg and make shorts out of them. They breath extremely well and, depending on the brand, are durable.

When I was in South America, one of my favorite dishes was white rice w/ a thin slice of ham on top and a couple fried eggs on top of that. Cheap and filling.

LostCreekAcres
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by LostCreekAcres »

Godislove wrote: June 11th, 2022, 6:44 pm
blitzinstripes wrote: June 11th, 2022, 3:55 pm Here is a great and inexpensive product that I recommend for everyone.

https://hotwhitepot.com/store/lehman-s- ... rm=1004742
How is it so inexpensive and able to offer free shipping? Quite sure I paid more for just the wringer alone.
I too am curious as to how it is so inexpensive. The same item on Lehman's site appears to be back ordered without a price attached to it. Have you actually ordered from the Hotwhitepot site? It appears wonky in its application. I'm afraid to give credit card information to them. The measurements appear to be rather small from other units I've looked at though, but even still, the price seems exceptionally low.

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harakim
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Location: Salt Lake Megalopolis

Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by harakim »

LostCreekAcres wrote: September 20th, 2022, 8:53 am
Godislove wrote: June 11th, 2022, 6:44 pm
blitzinstripes wrote: June 11th, 2022, 3:55 pm Here is a great and inexpensive product that I recommend for everyone.

https://hotwhitepot.com/store/lehman-s- ... rm=1004742
How is it so inexpensive and able to offer free shipping? Quite sure I paid more for just the wringer alone.
I too am curious as to how it is so inexpensive. The same item on Lehman's site appears to be back ordered without a price attached to it. Have you actually ordered from the Hotwhitepot site? It appears wonky in its application. I'm afraid to give credit card information to them. The measurements appear to be rather small from other units I've looked at though, but even still, the price seems exceptionally low.
It's probably a scam or you don't get the wringer or something.
https://www.lehmans.com/product/lehmans ... d-wringer/

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Just adding another thank you for the linen shirt suggestion. I have also bought several pairs of linen pants. My husband prefers these when working in the yard.

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Dusty Wanderer
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Dusty Wanderer »

Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 5:21 am Just adding another thank you for the linen shirt suggestion. I have also bought several pairs of linen pants. My husband prefers these when working in the yard.
What are the benefits of linen, other than its breathability?

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Momma J
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Momma J »

Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 21st, 2022, 10:38 am
Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 5:21 am Just adding another thank you for the linen shirt suggestion. I have also bought several pairs of linen pants. My husband prefers these when working in the yard.
What are the benefits of linen, other than its breathability?
Linen is breathable and moisture-wicking. Try working in the hot humid East Texas sun in a pair of cotton jeans for a few hours. They will be soaked in sweat. (forgive me, but my son calls this swamp butt). Try the same thing in Linen. I promise that you will be much more comfortable. The linen does not trap in your body heat.

I found the following on a linen sight and I have not verified their claims:
Linen breathes naturally and offers the best comfort in high heat.

Research has demonstrated that a person who wears linen sweats 1.5 times less than when wearing cotton and 2 times less than when wearing a synthetic such as rayon. Imagine how comfortable that would be for your body!

It is also extremely absorbent – it can absorb up to 20% of its weight in sweat before it even feels wet! (hello, sweaty bus rides in humid weather). It is also 3x stronger than cotton!

Linen, because of its natural fibers and production process, is inherently hypo-allergenic. Wearing linen will help you avoid common allergic reactions found with other fabrics, particularly synthetics. It is also antibacterial and is the only natural fibre that is accepted internally in the human body which is why linen has been used as bandages dating way back to the Egyptians.

Linen is naturally thermo-regulating. It’s insulating in the cold, and cool and breathable when it’s warm. Linen offers strong protection against solar radiation.

Exceptionally Long-Lasting: Linen is one of the few fabrics that actually get better with age. It becomes softer, smoother, and more lustrous. Lasting to 12 times as long as cotton, linen regularly passes from generation to generation

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Dusty Wanderer
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Re: Adding to our supplies

Post by Dusty Wanderer »

Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 12:01 pm
Dusty Wanderer wrote: September 21st, 2022, 10:38 am
Momma J wrote: September 21st, 2022, 5:21 am Just adding another thank you for the linen shirt suggestion. I have also bought several pairs of linen pants. My husband prefers these when working in the yard.
What are the benefits of linen, other than its breathability?
Linen is breathable and moisture-wicking. Try working in the hot humid East Texas sun in a pair of cotton jeans for a few hours. They will be soaked in sweat. (forgive me, but my son calls this swamp butt). Try the same thing in Linen. I promise that you will be much more comfortable. The linen does not trap in your body heat.

I found the following on a linen sight and I have not verified their claims:
Linen breathes naturally and offers the best comfort in high heat.

Research has demonstrated that a person who wears linen sweats 1.5 times less than when wearing cotton and 2 times less than when wearing a synthetic such as rayon. Imagine how comfortable that would be for your body!

It is also extremely absorbent – it can absorb up to 20% of its weight in sweat before it even feels wet! (hello, sweaty bus rides in humid weather). It is also 3x stronger than cotton!

Linen, because of its natural fibers and production process, is inherently hypo-allergenic. Wearing linen will help you avoid common allergic reactions found with other fabrics, particularly synthetics. It is also antibacterial and is the only natural fibre that is accepted internally in the human body which is why linen has been used as bandages dating way back to the Egyptians.

Linen is naturally thermo-regulating. It’s insulating in the cold, and cool and breathable when it’s warm. Linen offers strong protection against solar radiation.

Exceptionally Long-Lasting: Linen is one of the few fabrics that actually get better with age. It becomes softer, smoother, and more lustrous. Lasting to 12 times as long as cotton, linen regularly passes from generation to generation
Thanks, Momma J.

I'm a bit of an outdoorsman, so from your post I was wondering if linen could serve as a natural fiber base layer, as opposed to synthetic (since wool base layers are so expensive). It appears that you could use linen as a base layer. I'll have to give it a shot.

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