Extermination Order - what I just found out

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itsmerich
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Extermination Order - what I just found out

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I'm reading a book "from mission to madness" about JS youngest son and read that Sidney Rigdon gave a fiery speech about the LDS exterminating the mobs in missouri.
you can read it here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigdon%27 ... ir%20lives.

comments below the speech

The first half of the oration described the importance of the founding of the United States from a traditional and Church perspective. The second half of the oration was meant as a Mormon "declaration of independence" against "mobocrats" and Anti-Mormon persecution. In his speech, Rigdon declared:

"We take God and all the holy angels to witness this day, that we warn all men in the name of Jesus Christ, to come on us no more forever. For from this hour, we will bear it no more, our rights shall no more be trampled on with impunity. The man or the set of men, who attempts it, does it at the expense of their lives. And that mob that comes on us to disturb us; it shall be between us and them a war of extermination; for we will follow them till the last drop of their blood is spilled, or else they will have to exterminate us: for we will carry the seat of war to their own houses, and their own families, and one party or the other shall be utterly destroyed.—Remember it then all MEN.
We will never be the aggressors, we will infringe on the rights of no people; but shall stand for our own until death. We claim our own rights, and are willing that all others shall enjoy theirs.
No man shall be at liberty to come into our streets, to threaten us with mobs, for if he does, he shall atone for it before he leaves the place, neither shall he be at liberty, to vilify and slander any of us, for suffer it we will not in this place."

The speech alarmed local non-Mormons attending the celebration. Later, the church presidency published the July 4th Oration, causing considerable agitation and further stoking anti-Mormon sentiment throughout northwestern Missouri. Many contemporaries and later historians cite the July 4th Oration as a contributing factor to the 1838 Mormon War.

My comments: well....that explains WHY Gov Boggs saw the LDS as a clear threat. That's a fiery speech. Yes I get it, it was directed against the mob but that mob are Missouri citizens. Sidney would carry the war to their own homes! I can see how Gov Boggs saw this as basically a declaration of war/hostilities and looked to act first vs. await the "mormons" from attacking. E.g. a first strike. Yes I like how he said "we will never be the aggressors" but overall its a fiery tone. And yes, I'm sure if I was in Syndeys shoes and the early saints I'd be sick of being trampled upon as well

My main problem is we were NEVER taught what Syndey said - just that Gov Bogs was a douche and decided to have this law to exterminate us. This speech seems to be what SEALED the deal with Gov Boggs moving forward with his order. I doubt he would have done so without this speech first.

Really the more I look into church history the more disappointed I am with the complete white washing of details and selective choosing of what to tell/not tell.

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iWriteStuff
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

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itsmerich wrote: May 3rd, 2022, 5:27 pm I'm reading a book "from mission to madness" about JS youngest son and read that Sidney Rigdon gave a fiery speech about the LDS exterminating the mobs in missouri.
you can read it here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigdon%27 ... ir%20lives.

comments below the speech

The first half of the oration described the importance of the founding of the United States from a traditional and Church perspective. The second half of the oration was meant as a Mormon "declaration of independence" against "mobocrats" and Anti-Mormon persecution. In his speech, Rigdon declared:

"We take God and all the holy angels to witness this day, that we warn all men in the name of Jesus Christ, to come on us no more forever. For from this hour, we will bear it no more, our rights shall no more be trampled on with impunity. The man or the set of men, who attempts it, does it at the expense of their lives. And that mob that comes on us to disturb us; it shall be between us and them a war of extermination; for we will follow them till the last drop of their blood is spilled, or else they will have to exterminate us: for we will carry the seat of war to their own houses, and their own families, and one party or the other shall be utterly destroyed.—Remember it then all MEN.
We will never be the aggressors, we will infringe on the rights of no people; but shall stand for our own until death. We claim our own rights, and are willing that all others shall enjoy theirs.
No man shall be at liberty to come into our streets, to threaten us with mobs, for if he does, he shall atone for it before he leaves the place, neither shall he be at liberty, to vilify and slander any of us, for suffer it we will not in this place."

The speech alarmed local non-Mormons attending the celebration. Later, the church presidency published the July 4th Oration, causing considerable agitation and further stoking anti-Mormon sentiment throughout northwestern Missouri. Many contemporaries and later historians cite the July 4th Oration as a contributing factor to the 1838 Mormon War.

My comments: well....that explains WHY Gov Boggs saw the LDS as a clear threat. That's a fiery speech. Yes I get it, it was directed against the mob but that mob are Missouri citizens. Sidney would carry the war to their own homes! I can see how Gov Boggs saw this as basically a declaration of war/hostilities and looked to act first vs. await the "mormons" from attacking. E.g. a first strike. Yes I like how he said "we will never be the aggressors" but overall its a fiery tone. And yes, I'm sure if I was in Syndeys shoes and the early saints I'd be sick of being trampled upon as well

My main problem is we were NEVER taught what Syndey said - just that Gov Bogs was a douche and decided to have this law to exterminate us. This speech seems to be what SEALED the deal with Gov Boggs moving forward with his order. I doubt he would have done so without this speech first.

Really the more I look into church history the more disappointed I am with the complete white washing of details and selective choosing of what to tell/not tell.
You're just getting started. It was more than just speeches that set off the mobs. We only focus on the one side, but we weren't exactly blameless in the whole ordeal.

Welcome to pretty much all of church history.

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marc
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by marc »

itsmerich wrote: May 3rd, 2022, 5:27 pm I'm reading a book "from mission to madness" about JS youngest son and read that Sidney Rigdon gave a fiery speech about the LDS exterminating the mobs in missouri.
you can read it here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigdon%27 ... ir%20lives.

comments below the speech

The first half of the oration described the importance of the founding of the United States from a traditional and Church perspective. The second half of the oration was meant as a Mormon "declaration of independence" against "mobocrats" and Anti-Mormon persecution. In his speech, Rigdon declared:

"We take God and all the holy angels to witness this day, that we warn all men in the name of Jesus Christ, to come on us no more forever. For from this hour, we will bear it no more, our rights shall no more be trampled on with impunity. The man or the set of men, who attempts it, does it at the expense of their lives. And that mob that comes on us to disturb us; it shall be between us and them a war of extermination; for we will follow them till the last drop of their blood is spilled, or else they will have to exterminate us: for we will carry the seat of war to their own houses, and their own families, and one party or the other shall be utterly destroyed.—Remember it then all MEN.
We will never be the aggressors, we will infringe on the rights of no people; but shall stand for our own until death. We claim our own rights, and are willing that all others shall enjoy theirs.
No man shall be at liberty to come into our streets, to threaten us with mobs, for if he does, he shall atone for it before he leaves the place, neither shall he be at liberty, to vilify and slander any of us, for suffer it we will not in this place."

The speech alarmed local non-Mormons attending the celebration. Later, the church presidency published the July 4th Oration, causing considerable agitation and further stoking anti-Mormon sentiment throughout northwestern Missouri. Many contemporaries and later historians cite the July 4th Oration as a contributing factor to the 1838 Mormon War.

My comments: well....that explains WHY Gov Boggs saw the LDS as a clear threat. That's a fiery speech. Yes I get it, it was directed against the mob but that mob are Missouri citizens. Sidney would carry the war to their own homes! I can see how Gov Boggs saw this as basically a declaration of war/hostilities and looked to act first vs. await the "mormons" from attacking. E.g. a first strike. Yes I like how he said "we will never be the aggressors" but overall its a fiery tone. And yes, I'm sure if I was in Syndeys shoes and the early saints I'd be sick of being trampled upon as well

My main problem is we were NEVER taught what Syndey said - just that Gov Bogs was a douche and decided to have this law to exterminate us. This speech seems to be what SEALED the deal with Gov Boggs moving forward with his order. I doubt he would have done so without this speech first.

Really the more I look into church history the more disappointed I am with the complete white washing of details and selective choosing of what to tell/not tell.
Good to see more people digging deeper and waking up.

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Pazooka
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by Pazooka »

itsmerich wrote: May 3rd, 2022, 5:27 pm No man shall be at liberty to come into our streets, to threaten us with mobs, for if he does, he shall atone for it before he leaves the place..
Note the concept of blood atonement in there.

Very interesting post. Is this one of those instances that had JS wanting to be rid of Rigdon - for shooting off at the mouth like that in a way that put their lives in danger? Or was it something JS felt was called for, I wonder? I had never heard that side of it.

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zionssuburb
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by zionssuburb »

The Living Scriptures Church History narration available late 70's early 80's was my first exposure. I also lived in that area for a great deal of time, there is still a sentiment that they get a bad wrap, but violence in the Mormon community at that time was directed, mostly, inward (those who sold holdings in Jackson County, for instance, those that maybe weren't as loyal to JS in Kirtland as some would've liked). This was rhetoric meant to increase the feelings of belonging in the crowd.

It was always about money, money and trade, mostly in the outfitting of settlers, a large reason to have been kicked out of Jackson County was that Mormons started to undercut outfitters and take business away from them, after the State created Ray County for the Mormons, they were given the land directly between the old settlers and the Army, where Mormons had quicker access to supply the Army and started to take away contracts. It's always about money.

onefour1
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by onefour1 »

I think Rigdon was simply saying that instead of sitting back and taking it, he is saying that we will defend ourselves even if it means an all out war with our enemies. To say that Boggs is somehow innocent for his extermination order is ridiculous. Boggs obviously is siding with the mobs and does not see the Rigdon statement as one of self preservation. True, remaining silent may have saved us from the persecution, but Rigdon's rights to free speech and redress against the mob is understandable given the circumstances and Boggs order was simply way out of line. Boggs should have come down heavily on the mobs in the first place.

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BuriedTartaria
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by BuriedTartaria »

*I have read that we do not have a copy of Sydney’s exact Salt Sermon remarks (the precursor to his July 4th oration)

I’m not a supporter of the fallen prophet theory (though I think it could be possible) but I have empathy for David Whitmer’s feelings as he left (and was seemingly chased out) of the church

I kind of like Sidney too but he seems to be in the wrong here




*According to Wikipedia (but I think other places report the same thing), so take it for what its worth;
Wikipedia Article wrote:On 19 June 1838, in Far West, Rigdon delivered a harsh public condemnation of a large number of the members and leaders of the church for their perceived disloyalty towards Smith and Rigdon. While no summary or text of Rigdon's sermon remains, eyewitnesses indicated that Rigdon took the subject of his text from the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_Sermon#Sermon

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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by Lineman1012 »

onefour1 wrote: May 3rd, 2022, 7:09 pm I think Rigdon was simply saying that instead of sitting back and taking it, he is saying that we will defend ourselves even if it means an all out war with our enemies. To say that Boggs is somehow innocent for his extermination order is ridiculous. Boggs obviously is siding with the mobs and does not see the Rigdon statement as one of self preservation. True, remaining silent may have saved us from the persecution, but Rigdon's rights to free speech and redress against the mob is understandable given the circumstances and Boggs order was simply way out of line. Boggs should have come down heavily on the mobs in the first place.
I think it’s quite interesting that the eternal principle of “what comes around - goes around” goes into affect here. Rigdon is the first to use the term “extermination” and it comes back and bites all of Mormondom with Boggs’ “Extermination Order”.

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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

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The great-grandson of Lilburn W. Boggs, Alvah Boggs gives this testimony shortly after his conversion in 1956: "My brothers and sisters, I indeed feel humble. I am just a recent convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, to be exact, just one week. . . My great-grandfather should have done everything in his power to protect any group of people or persons who wanted to worship God in any manner that they cared to worship him. This he certainly denied The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I feel very remorseful for my parental linage for that particular thing. . . . I joined the Church because I believe in my heart this is the Church of God."
Alvah Boggs, "Testimony, 1956," LDS Church Archives

Another tidbit. Yesterday I asked who sold land to Rebecca Hopper Peterson after she moved to Sonoma, California soon after her husband, Ziba passed away. Believe it or not, it was none other than ex-Missouri governor Lilburn W. Boggs. Yes, the same man who issued the infamous extermination order during the fall of 1838 to expel or kill the Saints residing in the state of Missouri. So you ask, how in the world did he end up in California? History is full of surprises. To prove it, try this. As the first vanguard company of Saints, led by Brigham Young were trudging their way to the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, Lilburn W. Boggs was leading a group of people just two days on the trail ahead of President Young. It's this situation which led to a comical situation. When Lilburn and his group reached Fort Laramie in eastern Wyoming, he was quick to point out to the fort Commander, a man by the name of Bordeaux, that the Mormons were not too far behind and would soon be at the fort. The ex-governor made sure he warned Bordeaux that he had better keep a close eye on his horses and other livestock as the Mormons would steal them. The book, The Gathering: Mormon Pioneers on the Trail to Zion, reveals, "It was a hard accusation, borne of meanheartedness, but even harder for Bordeaux to take seriously because Boggs was having so much trouble with his own company. Fighting and contention among them had risen to such a pitch that many had deserted, and Bordeaux had told the ex-governor that no matter how bad the Mormons were, they could not be any worse than he and his men."

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kirtland r.m.
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by kirtland r.m. »

itsmerich wrote: May 3rd, 2022, 5:27 pm I'm reading a book "from mission to madness" about JS youngest son and read that Sidney Rigdon gave a fiery speech about the LDS exterminating the mobs in missouri.
you can read it here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigdon%27 ... ir%20lives.

comments below the speech

The first half of the oration described the importance of the founding of the United States from a traditional and Church perspective. The second half of the oration was meant as a Mormon "declaration of independence" against "mobocrats" and Anti-Mormon persecution. In his speech, Rigdon declared:

"We take God and all the holy angels to witness this day, that we warn all men in the name of Jesus Christ, to come on us no more forever. For from this hour, we will bear it no more, our rights shall no more be trampled on with impunity. The man or the set of men, who attempts it, does it at the expense of their lives. And that mob that comes on us to disturb us; it shall be between us and them a war of extermination; for we will follow them till the last drop of their blood is spilled, or else they will have to exterminate us: for we will carry the seat of war to their own houses, and their own families, and one party or the other shall be utterly destroyed.—Remember it then all MEN.
We will never be the aggressors, we will infringe on the rights of no people; but shall stand for our own until death. We claim our own rights, and are willing that all others shall enjoy theirs.
No man shall be at liberty to come into our streets, to threaten us with mobs, for if he does, he shall atone for it before he leaves the place, neither shall he be at liberty, to vilify and slander any of us, for suffer it we will not in this place."

The speech alarmed local non-Mormons attending the celebration. Later, the church presidency published the July 4th Oration, causing considerable agitation and further stoking anti-Mormon sentiment throughout northwestern Missouri. Many contemporaries and later historians cite the July 4th Oration as a contributing factor to the 1838 Mormon War.

My comments: well....that explains WHY Gov Boggs saw the LDS as a clear threat. That's a fiery speech. Yes I get it, it was directed against the mob but that mob are Missouri citizens. Sidney would carry the war to their own homes! I can see how Gov Boggs saw this as basically a declaration of war/hostilities and looked to act first vs. await the "mormons" from attacking. E.g. a first strike. Yes I like how he said "we will never be the aggressors" but overall its a fiery tone. And yes, I'm sure if I was in Syndeys shoes and the early saints I'd be sick of being trampled upon as well

My main problem is we were NEVER taught what Syndey said - just that Gov Bogs was a douche and decided to have this law to exterminate us. This speech seems to be what SEALED the deal with Gov Boggs moving forward with his order. I doubt he would have done so without this speech first.

Really the more I look into church history the more disappointed I am with the complete white washing of details and selective choosing of what to tell/not tell.
Itsmerich and others, you won't feel near as bad when you dig deeper. The persecution against the saints there started a full five years before your quote above. By this time, many innocent saints had been murdered and raped, homes burned, ect.. Here is a taste of some of the experiences going on there.
Alexander W. Doniphan was not the only military leader who could see the plight of the Saints and stood up for them. General David R. Atchison could also see and worked to honestly help the Saints. When the trouble with the mob commenced, Colonel Robinson took about one-half of the force to Adam-ondi-Ahman to defend that place. Joseph, Hyrum and Sidney also went with them, leaving me in command at Far West. The detachment returned in about four days.
A few days afterwards Joseph Smith and I took a walk out upon the prairie, and in the course of our conversation I suggested to him to send for General [David R.] Atchison to defend him in the suit then brought against him, as he was in command of the third division of the militia of the State of Missouri, and was a lawyer and a friend to law. Joseph made no reply, but turned back immediately to Far West, and a man was selected, with the best horse to be found, to go to Liberty for General Atchison.
The next day General Atchison came to Far West with a hundred men and camped a little north of the town.
On consulting with Joseph Smith, Atchison told him that he did not want anyone to go with them to his trial, which was to take place midway between Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman. Joseph at first hesitated about agreeing to this, but Atchison reassured him by saying: "My life for yours!"
When they arrived at the place of trial quite a number of the mob had gathered, and on seeing Joseph commenced to curse and swear. Atchison, however, checked them by saying: "Hold on boys, if you fire the first gun there will not be one of you left!"
Joseph was cleared and came away unmolested. Soon afterwards the governor, thinking Atchison was too friendly towards the Saints, took his command from him and placed General [John B.] Clark in command of the militia.
Shortly before Far West was besieged, I was taken sick, and Colonel [George M.] Hinkle came into military command under his old commission. I gave up my horse, saddle and bridle, and also my rifle and sword for Brother Lysander Gee to use in defense of our city. When General Clark's army came up against Far West, Colonel Hinkle betrayed the First Presidency of the Church into their hands for seven hundred and fifty dollars. Then Joseph and Hyrum [Smith], Sidney [Rigdon], and Lyman Wight were taken by the mob, who held a court-martial over them and sentenced them to be shot the next morning at eight o'clock on the public square. Lyman Wight told them to "shoot and be damned." Generals Atchison and [Alexander W.] Doniphan immediately rebelled against the decision, and Doniphan said, if men were to be murdered in cold blood, he would withdraw his troops, which he did. General Atchison then went to Liberty and gave a public dinner, and delivered a speech, in which he said, "If the governor does not restore my commission to me, I will kill him, so help me God!" On hearing this the audience became so enthusiastic that they took him upon their shoulders and carried him around the public square.
“Early Scenes in Church History, Four Faith Promoting Classics (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1968), 74-96.

A few more experiences. The following from the journal of Parley P. Pratt:
After some days of prayer and fasting, and seeking the Lord on the subject, I retired to my bed in my lonely chamber at an early hour, and while the other prisoners and the guard were chatting and beguiling the lonesome hours in the upper apartment of the prison, I lay in silence, seeking and expecting an answer to my prayer, when suddenly I seemed carried away in the spirit, and no longer sensible to our ward objects with which I was surrounded. A heaven of peace and calmness pervaded my bosom; a personage from the world of spirits stood before me with a smile of compassion in every look, and pity mingled with the tenderest love and sympathy in every expression of the countenance. A soft hand seemed placed within my own, and a glowing cheek was laid in tenderness and warmth upon mine. A well known voice saluted me, which I readily recognized as that of the wife of my youth, who had for near two years been sweetly sleeping where the wicked cease from troubling and the weary are at rest. I was made to realize that she was sent to commune with me, and answer my question.
Knowing this, I said to her in a most earnest and inquiring tone: Shall I ever be at liberty again in this life and enjoy the society of my family and the Saints, and Preach the gospel as I have done? She answered definitely and unhesitatingly: ‘YES!” I then recollected that I had agreed to be satisfied with the knowledge of that one fact, but now I wanted more.
Said I” Can you tell me how, or by what means, or when I shall escape? She replied: “THAT THING IS NOT MADE KNOWN TO ME YET.” I instantly felt that I had gone beyond my agreement and my faith in asking this last question, and that I must be content at present with the answer to the first.
Her gentle spirit then saluted me and withdrew. I came to myself. The doleful noise of the guards, and the wrangling and angry words of the old apostate again grated on my ears, but Heaven and hope were in my soul.
Scot Facer Proctor and Maurine Jensen Proctor, The Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2000), 295-297.

The following from Anson Call: While passing up the Missouri River there was a gentleman who came to our room and said that he had learned there were Mormons on the boat. Brother Smith spoke: “Yes, we are Mormons. . . .” The gentleman said, “Where are you going?” “To Far West, sir,” was the reply. The man then remarked, “I am sorry to see so respectable a looking company journeying to that place.” Brother Smith said, “Why so?” He replied, “Because you will be driven from there before six months.” “By whom?” “By the Missourians, gentlemen,” said he. My father spoke and said, “Are there not human beings in that country as well as others?” He said, “Gentlemen, I presume you are not aware of the gentleman you are talking to.” The reply was, “A Missourian, I presume.” The gentleman again spoke, “Yes, gentlemen, I am Colonel Wilson of Jackson County. I was one of the principal actors in driving the Mormons from that county and expect to be soon engaged in driving them from Caldwell County.”
He advised us to stop in some other place, for if we went to Far West we were surely to be butchered. We told him we were no better than our brethren and if they died, we were willing to die with them. “Gentlemen,” he said, “You appear to be very determined in your minds. Mormonism must and shall be put down.” He read to us a letter which he had just received form Newell, which consisted of a bundle of falsehoods concerning our people in Kirtland. “Thrice as false, Joe’s career must and shall be stopped.”: He then started for the door. I then remarked, “If you will stop a moment or two, I will tell you the way it can be done, for there is but one way of accomplishing it.” “What is that, Sir?” he said. I answered, “Dethrone the Almighty and Joes’ career is ended and never until then.” He left us very abruptly.
Autobiography of Anson Call

From the life of John Thompson: I at one time took a couple of apostates, Henry and John Sermon, to see Martin Harris and to talk to him. One of them asked Mr. Harris if he believed the Book of Mormon to be true, and he told them, "No." They told him they had heard that he had never denied the truth of the Book [of Mormon]. He told them that he knew it was true and that was past believing. After that John Sermon went to Salt Lake City, joined the Church and married a bishops's daughter and lived a good life after.
John Thompson, Autobiography, Harold B. Lee Library, pp. 8-9.

The following is an excerpt from a letter of Mary Fielding to her sister, Mercy.
“I felt much pleased to see Sisters Walton and Snider who arrived here on Saturday about noon, having left Brother Joseph Smith and Rigdon about 20 miles from Fareport [Fairport] (Ohio) to evade the mobbers. They were to come home in Dr. (Sampson) Avards carriage and expected to arrive about 10 o'clock at night but to their great disappointment they were prevented in a most grievous manner. They had got within 4 miles of home after a very fatiguing journey, much pleased with their visit to Canada and greatly anticipating the pleasure of seeing their homes and families, when they were surrounded with a mob and taken back to Painesville and secured as was supposed in a tavern where they intended to hold a mock trial. But to the disappointment of the wretches the housekeeper was a member of the church who assisted our beloved brethren in making their escape, but as Brother Joseph Smith says not by a basket let down through a window, but by the kitchen door.”
Kenneth W. and Audrey M. Godfrey, Jill Mulvay Derr, Women's Voices (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1982), pp. 60-68.

The following is an excerpt from a letter of Mary Fielding to her sister, Mercy.
“I felt much pleased to see Sisters Walton and Snider who arrived here on Saturday about noon, having left Brother Joseph Smith and Rigdon about 20 miles from Fareport [Fairport] (Ohio) to evade the mobbers. They were to come home in Dr. (Sampson) Avards carriage and expected to arrive about 10 o'clock at night but to their great disappointment they were prevented in a most grievous manner. They had got within 4 miles of home after a very fatiguing journey, much pleased with their visit to Canada and greatly anticipating the pleasure of seeing their homes and families, when they were surrounded with a mob and taken back to Painesville and secured as was supposed in a tavern where they intended to hold a mock trial. But to the disappointment of the wretches the housekeeper was a member of the church who assisted our beloved brethren in making their escape, but as Brother Joseph Smith says not by a basket let down through a window, but by the kitchen door.”
Kenneth W. and Audrey M. Godfrey, Jill Mulvay Derr, Women's Voices (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1982), pp. 60-68.

The following refers to the mob looking into Far West just prior to the Battle of Far West:
“They came on the direction of our city; which produced some little stir in the place, and in a few minutes there was about two hundred men both old and young, mustered to the public square in the city; the rest of the men living absent. We were immediately marched to the south boundary line of the city in the direction of the mob to defend our wives and children and property from destruction. When we arrived to our post the mob was coming down on to a low piece of ground on the boarders of Goose Creek where there was some scattering timber that took them out of our sight but some of them climbed up in to the trees and looked over into the city and swore that they saw an army of men that would number thousands. This we learned from our brethren that was prisoner then in their camp; the sight of this great army brought terror to their camp which caused them to halt for a little time.
Autobiography of William Draper, Typescript, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University

“It is a fact which should be remembered. . . . . the Hancock brothers, Levi, Joseph, and Solomon, with their guns guarded and fed 600 men, women, and children while camped in the woods after they had been driven from their homes. They were waiting for an opportunity to get away. I saw the Prophet marched away; and I saw, oh, the scenes I witnessed! I do not think people would believe them, so I will forbear. The howling fiends, although they wore the uniforms of the U.S., they were not to be trusted! So some of the brethren made three hundred tomahawks for protection.
Autobiography of Mosiah Hancock

The persecutions in Jackson County started in 1833. It would have begun a year earlier in 1832 except that a non-Mormon Indian agent put a stop to it. The following from the Times and Seasons:
As the church increased the hostile spirit of the people increased also.—The enemies circulated from time to time, all manner of false stories against the saints, hoping thereby to stir up the indignation of others. In the spring of 1832 they began to brick-bat or stone the houses of the saints, breaking in windows, &c., not only disturbing, but endangering the lives of the inmates. In the course of that season a county meeting was called at Independence, to adopt measures to drive our people from the country; but the meeting broke up, without coming to any agreement about them; having had too much confusion among themselves, to do more than to have a few knock-downs, after taking a plentiful supply of whiskey.
The result of this meeting may be attributed in part, to the influence of certain patriotic individuals; among whom General Clark, a sub-Indian agent, may be considered as principal, He hearing of the meeting, came from his agency, or from home, some thirty or forty miles distant, a day or two before the meeting.
He appeared quite indignant, at the idea of having the constitution and laws set at defiance, and trodden under foot, by the many trampling upon the rights of the few. He went to certain influential mob characters, and offered to decide the case with them in single combat: he said that it would be better for one or two individuals to die, than for hundreds to be put to death.
Times and Seasons, Vol. 1 No. 2. December, 1839.

The Battle of Crooked River on October 24, 1838 is noted for the fact that two commanders of the Missouri state militia faced-off against each other and both were also ecclesiastical leaders. David Patten, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve and Samuel Bogart, a Methodist minister.
James B. Allen and Glen M. Leonard, The Story of the Latter-day Saints (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1992), 136.

I've got plenty more. Here is a very very good start. Section 87: A Prophecy on War, Civil War, Great Brittan and W.W.2 and moreviewtopic.php?p=1252826&hilit=saxey#p1252826 Much background there on Missouri history and fulfilled prophesy.

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Niemand
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

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It was an illegal proclamation and the attacks on children can't be justified.

If you think this is ancient history, look into what happened in the Waco Siege. It did not go down the way the authorities tried to claim.

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BeNotDeceived
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Re: Extermination Order - what I just found out

Post by BeNotDeceived »

Niemand wrote: May 4th, 2022, 5:46 am It was an illegal proclamation and the attacks on children can't be justified.

If you think this is ancient history, look into what happened in the Waco Siege. It did not go down the way the authorities tried to claim.
Waco made possible the top pic at march8miracle.org

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