Thoughts on US dietary guidelines and secret combinations

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Jashon
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Thoughts on US dietary guidelines and secret combinations

Post by Jashon »

The terrible US dietary guidelines, which we've had since the late 1970s, and which have spread to different parts of the world, are another example of the evil of secret combinations. In this case, decades ago corrupt researchers, influenced by rich and powerful industries like sugar and tobacco, achieved widespread acceptance of dietary notions and guidelines that actually promote chronic disease.

The sugar and tobacco industries wanted to shift the blame for cardiovascular disease away from their industries, and had the money to do it. Nowadays, the evil of the tobacco industry has been largely replaced by big food producers of industrial seed oils. One of the evil actors in the 1950s and '60s was the famous Ancel Keys. Another one, Mark Hegsted, had an LDS background (born and raised in Rexburg, ID in the 1910s and '20s). He was at Harvard in the '60s when he sold out to the sugar industry.

I personally don't worry one bit about limiting my consumption of saturated fat (it's a biochemically stable fat). I limit my consumption of carbohydrates, instead. And I avoid all "vegetable" oils completely, which are unstable polyunsaturated fats and metabolically toxic (metabolites like 4-HNE and 13-HODE).

You want to die from a chronic disease, become obese by loading up on carbs and vegetable oil, which break your natural satiety mechanism. Ingesting a lot of vegetable oil – these oils are everywhere now, esp. soybean oil – makes our fat cells hypertrophy and eventually burst and gives us inflammation, which can lead to deadly results in certain situations. You want to repair your satiety mechanism, eat saturated fat and protein and limit your carb intake.

The healthcare industry is mostly just involved in the business of disease management by expensive medications. As presently constituted, practitioners are run by pharmaceutical companies which resist answers that get at root causes. The PTB refuse to shift the dietary guidelines meaningfully, and they don't seem to care, since so many are making plenty of money. Suppose you're an orthopedic surgeon. You don't work on improving the diet of your patients to avoid joint replacement surgery. Instead, you perform as many joint replacements as you can. If you don't, you'll be run out of your practice by the power of the hospital.

Of note is that tons of people, young and old, are subject to the bad food given to them in government-run facilities, which follow the government's faulty dietary guidelines. This all negatively affects not only physical health, but also mental health: brain function and mood. The gut and brain are connected. The principal reason we have so much dementia and Alzheimer's is from our lousy, post-modern diet loaded up with carbs and seed oils. Once you put a relative in a healthcare facility with failing mental health, they're toast, since they're going to get a crap diet that will worsen their brain function. Anyone with early-onset dementia needs ketones and lactic acid and a low-carb diet. Hardly anyone gets that.

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Jamescm
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Re: Thoughts on US dietary guidelines and secret combinations

Post by Jamescm »

My thoughts on US dietary guidelines is that I wouldn't believe any world government if it told me the sky was blue without knowing that they'd wait until the blackness of night to say so.

I think the human diet is not only extremely diverse, but extremely flexible. Lots of bread, little to no bread. Lots of meat, little to no meat. In concert with other elements of your lifestyle, I don't think there is one true standard that one ought to follow. Eskimos live almost entirely on red meat, Shaolin monks abstain from animal products altogether, and there are African nomads who live almost entirely on the milk and yogurt of their herds. A manual farmer, a farmer with machinery, a strength athlete, a marathon runner, an IT expert, and a couch potato all have differing ideals to reach for in terms of diet, neverminding their differences in sex, height, current weight, and hobbies.

Just eat some of everything and do some exercise. Pay attention to your body, it will tell you what you should change, then make the changes. About the only thing I intentionally avoid are vegetable/seed oils, artificial sweeteners, and soda. After experiencing children, as absurd as it sounds, I would also suggest caution with food dyes.

JuneBug12000
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Re: Thoughts on US dietary guidelines and secret combinations

Post by JuneBug12000 »

Jashon wrote: April 2nd, 2022, 9:27 am The terrible US dietary guidelines, which we've had since the late 1970s, and which have spread to different parts of the world, are another example of the evil of secret combinations. In this case, decades ago corrupt researchers, influenced by rich and powerful industries like sugar and tobacco, achieved widespread acceptance of dietary notions and guidelines that actually promote chronic disease.

The sugar and tobacco industries wanted to shift the blame for cardiovascular disease away from their industries, and had the money to do it. Nowadays, the evil of the tobacco industry has been largely replaced by big food producers of industrial seed oils. One of the evil actors in the 1950s and '60s was the famous Ancel Keys. Another one, Mark Hegsted, had an LDS background (born and raised in Rexburg, ID in the 1910s and '20s). He was at Harvard in the '60s when he sold out to the sugar industry.

I personally don't worry one bit about limiting my consumption of saturated fat (it's a biochemically stable fat). I limit my consumption of carbohydrates, instead. And I avoid all "vegetable" oils completely, which are unstable polyunsaturated fats and metabolically toxic (metabolites like 4-HNE and 13-HODE).

You want to die from a chronic disease, become obese by loading up on carbs and vegetable oil, which break your natural satiety mechanism. Ingesting a lot of vegetable oil – these oils are everywhere now, esp. soybean oil – makes our fat cells hypertrophy and eventually burst and gives us inflammation, which can lead to deadly results in certain situations. You want to repair your satiety mechanism, eat saturated fat and protein and limit your carb intake.

The healthcare industry is mostly just involved in the business of disease management by expensive medications. As presently constituted, practitioners are run by pharmaceutical companies which resist answers that get at root causes. The PTB refuse to shift the dietary guidelines meaningfully, and they don't seem to care, since so many are making plenty of money. Suppose you're an orthopedic surgeon. You don't work on improving the diet of your patients to avoid joint replacement surgery. Instead, you perform as many joint replacements as you can. If you don't, you'll be run out of your practice by the power of the hospital.

Of note is that tons of people, young and old, are subject to the bad food given to them in government-run facilities, which follow the government's faulty dietary guidelines. This all negatively affects not only physical health, but also mental health: brain function and mood. The gut and brain are connected. The principal reason we have so much dementia and Alzheimer's is from our lousy, post-modern diet loaded up with carbs and seed oils. Once you put a relative in a healthcare facility with failing mental health, they're toast, since they're going to get a crap diet that will worsen their brain function. Anyone with early-onset dementia needs ketones and lactic acid and a low-carb diet. Hardly anyone gets that.
I learned this the hard way.

I am pretty conscientious so I tried to eat healthy the way I was taught, and when it didn't work, I doubled down. I figured I must be doing it wrong. Then I doubled down again. It has only been in the last few years that the light bulb went on. I had even read books like Nourishing Traditions along the way, but it seemed to contradict the WOW so I just accepted raw milk was good and skipped the rest. But raw milk is expensive in Utah, and you have to sign papers and be on a list to buy it. So I only did that rarely. Here in Idaho it is half the price and I can get it at the local store.

In the end eating twice a day and lots less carbs seems to produce the best "fruit." for me.

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Momma J
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Re: Thoughts on US dietary guidelines and secret combinations

Post by Momma J »

Have you noticed that during the pandemic and growing shortages that there is always well stocked shelves of chips, doughnuts, cookies, snack cakes, etc.? We may not find flour to bake our own bread, but we can buy all the junk that we could ever want.

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mudflap
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Re: Thoughts on US dietary guidelines and secret combinations

Post by mudflap »

Momma J wrote: May 31st, 2022, 6:06 am Have you noticed that during the pandemic and growing shortages that there is always well stocked shelves of chips, doughnuts, cookies, snack cakes, etc.? We may not find flour to bake our own bread, but we can buy all the junk that we could ever want.
that may be because those items can be made months (years?) ahead of time and rolled out whenever they want. But you make a good point -

I read up a few years ago on apples - I was so disgusted with mushy apple from Walmart I started studying supply chains for apples - did you know most varieties of apples that are promoted in the stores for "sweetness" or "tartness" or "crunchiness" or whatever are promoted to sellers as "long lasting" or "stores well"? The apple might be ripe in August, but you don't get to eat it until February. They are trying to produce apples that store for months so they can roll them out any time stock becomes low. Sounds good, but they aren't concerned at all about nutritional value. You buy most fruits/veggies "by the pound", but not by "nutritional value". So do you think the industry, when negotiating with BigAG farmers, is buying based on how good the stuff is for you, or how much it weighs?

And once you understand that it is ONLY about profit for them, and not about "good for you", you'll be motivated to start shopping at the local farmers market or grow your own.

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Momma J
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Re: Thoughts on US dietary guidelines and secret combinations

Post by Momma J »

mudflap wrote: May 31st, 2022, 6:52 am
Momma J wrote: May 31st, 2022, 6:06 am Have you noticed that during the pandemic and growing shortages that there is always well stocked shelves of chips, doughnuts, cookies, snack cakes, etc.? We may not find flour to bake our own bread, but we can buy all the junk that we could ever want.
that may be because those items can be made months (years?) ahead of time and rolled out whenever they want. But you make a good point -

I read up a few years ago on apples - I was so disgusted with mushy apple from Walmart I started studying supply chains for apples - did you know most varieties of apples that are promoted in the stores for "sweetness" or "tartness" or "crunchiness" or whatever are promoted to sellers as "long lasting" or "stores well"? The apple might be ripe in August, but you don't get to eat it until February. They are trying to produce apples that store for months so they can roll them out any time stock becomes low. Sounds good, but they aren't concerned at all about nutritional value. You buy most fruits/veggies "by the pound", but not by "nutritional value". So do you think the industry, when negotiating with BigAG farmers, is buying based on how good the stuff is for you, or how much it weighs?

And once you understand that it is ONLY about profit for them, and not about "good for you", you'll be motivated to start shopping at the local farmers market or grow your own.
Good points. Frozen foods have much higher nutrient value than fresh (in the grocery store). I learned this while working for Green Giant in Buhl, Idaho many years ago. The corn was harvested at the peak of ripeness. A well oiled system; checking the fields, harvesting, delivering to processing center, ran up conveyor belts, husked, cut, and flash frozen all with a few hours time. You will not find corn sitting in trucks or laying in piles for days... or even hours.

Most produce in the grocery store is picked before it becomes ripe, never gaining the nutrients or flavor you would obtain from letting the foods ripen in the garden.

I love shopping at local farmers stands

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